One Crisis Away | KERA News

One Crisis Away

KERA’s One Crisis Away project focuses a spotlight on North Texans living on the financial edge both in weekly stories and regular in-depth series.

A scene from West Dallas near Singleton Boulevard.
Credit Allison V. Smith / KERA News special contributor

A job loss, health emergency, even legal trouble can be enough to plunge a third of our friends and neighbors into financial distress. One Crisis Away puts a human face on asset poverty and the financial struggles of people in Dallas-Fort Worth.  

Explore multimedia projects: No Place To Go, a deep dive into affordable housing and gentrification in West Dallas; Rebuilding A Life, a series about North Texans recovering from devastating tornadoes; Drowning In Debt, stories about and resources for living with financial burden; and more.

Where's The Affordable Housing In Dallas?

Dec 24, 2013
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An investigation by the federal government into Dallas’ affordable housing practices has found that the city violates civil rights laws. This hour, Krys Boyd examined what the allegations say about Dallas with Scott Griggs, vice chairman of the Dallas City Council housing committee, and Ken Smith, who leads the Revitalize South Dallas Coalition.

KERA's series One Crisis Away looks at four families on the financial edge. In the video below, meet Natalie Berquist and her 4-year-old son, Samuel. Natalie was laid off late last year, and even though she was only unemployed for about a month, she's still digging out of the financial hole.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Unemployment is one of the most forbidding words in the English language. If you don’t have money socked away for emergencies, it doesn’t matter if you’re out of work for a year, losing a job can wreck your finances.

Meet Natalie Berquist. The Lewisville mother of two lost her job late last year. Even though she found another in less than a month, she faced homelessness and is still digging out of the financial hole.

Natalie’s story is the latest in our series One Crisis Away, a look at the one in three North Texans who have almost no financial cushion.

In an ideal world, senior citizens will have saved enough to comfortably retire. But with pensions disappearing and health care costs soaring, the golden years are becoming increasingly difficult. As part of KERA’s One Crisis Away initiative, Krys Boyd talks with Senior Source executive director Molly Bogen and Dallas Area Agency on Aging director Millie DeAnda about the financial challenges seniors face.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Chasing an energetic 1-year-old, balancing shaky finances and managing a rare disease is a tall order for any family. But it’s reality for Isac and Elizabeth Madrid, a Rockwall couple we’re featuring in our series One Crisis Away.

Like many North Texans, Isac and Elizabeth were living a typical middle class life, until a medical emergency knocked them off their feet.

Now, each day is a battle that starts at Baylor Medical Center.

KERA's series One Crisis Away looks at four families on the financial edge. Isac Madrid suffers from a rare illness that makes it impossible for him to work and support his wife Elizabeth and 1-year-old son. He's already had a liver transplant and received his second bone marrow transplant on Nov. 11.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Preparing for retirement is daunting for anybody. Without an inheritance, a hefty pension or a 401K, it can be tough to just get by.

Take Shirley Martin. She’s 72, she lives in Desoto and she’s struggling to make ends meet. One of every three North Texans is in the same boat. They don’t have enough money set aside to live for three months after a financial hit.

Shirley is one of the people featured in KERA's new series, One Crisis Away. Instead of getting discouraged, Shirley’s getting creative. [Watch the video of Shirley's story here.]

KERA's series One Crisis Away looks at four families on the financial edge. In this profile, meet Shirley Martin, a 72 year-old woman living in Desoto. Divorced and a breast cancer survivor, Shirley can't afford to live on her small annual retirement and Social Security, so she takes in boarders through a nonprofit called Shared Housing.

Here's KERA's video of her story. [Listen to the radio story here.]

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Texas is a big state, with a big heart. That means a lot of non-profit organizations and well-meaning charities ready to help citizens in need. But sifting through all the options can be overwhelming.

As part of our new series “One Crisis Away,” a look at where to start if you find yourself short on cash or resources. And the first step can be simple as dialing three numbers—2-1-1.

'American Winter' Documentary Examines Poverty Crisis

Nov 13, 2013
Courtesy: American Winter

How are families around the country dealing with asset poverty? As part of KERA's new multimedia initiative called One Crisis Away, Krys Boyd talked with filmmaker Harry Gantz, director of the documentary American Winter, which looks at families struggling to make it in Portland, Oregon.

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This week, KERA kicks off a new multimedia initiative called One Crisis Away, which looks at North Texas families living with asset poverty. On this hour of Think, Krys Boyd discussed financial literacy with YWCA of Dallas CEO Jennifer Ware and Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Dallas‘ Todd Mark.

Dane Walters / KERA News

The Madrids look like a lot of families in North Texas; a married couple in their 20s with a young child and a house in Rockwall.  Then a health emergency turned their world upside down.

The Madrids are the first family we’re profiling in KERA’s new series One Crisis Away. A third of North Texans don’t have enough savings to cover a three month financial disruption, which means folks like the Madrids are living on the edge.

KERA's new series One Crisis Away looks at four families on the financial edge. In the first profile, meet Isac Madrid, his wife Elizabeth and their 1-year-old son. Eighteen months ago, they had two incomes and a savings account. Now, after a medical setback, they're barely hanging on financially.

Learn more about the Madrid family.

NoHoDamon / Flickr

One out of every three North Texans is walking a financial tightrope and could be knocked off by just one crisis; a medical emergency, an eviction, a job loss.

In KERA’s new series One Crisis Away,  we introduce a concept known as asset poverty.

“This really measures the ability of a household to exist at the poverty level for just three months if their main source of income is disrupted,” says Andrea Levere, president of the Corporation for Enterprise Development.

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Four in ten people in Dallas are at risk of financial disaster. They live in “asset poverty” according to a new study. KERA’s BJ Austin reports.

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