Robots | KERA News

Robots

food delivery robot
Courtesy of University of Texas at Dallas

Spend some time on the campus of the University of Texas at Dallas, and you may see some robots roaming around. They're on a mission: delivering food and snacks to hungry students, staff and faculty — for a $1.99 delivery fee.

A worker lifts a lunch bowl off the production line at Spyce, a restaurant which uses a robotic cooking process, in Boston.
Associated Press

Robots aren't replacing everyone, but a quarter of U.S. jobs will be severely disrupted as artificial intelligence accelerates the automation of existing work, according to a new Brookings Institution report.

Thursday's report from the Washington think tank says roughly 36 million Americans hold jobs with "high exposure" to automation — meaning at least 70 percent of their tasks could soon be performed by machines using current technology. 

Molly Evans / KERA News

Robots are assuming more and more roles in our daily lives. They can ask us about our day, play songs for us and, as one study from the University of Texas Arlington shows, can perform Shakespeare with us, too. 

Marcel Oosterwijk, flickr

In June 2014, Julian Pinto kicked the first ball of the World Cup. He isn’t a soccer star or a celebrity, but his kick attracted quite a bit of attention—because it signified a major breakthrough in brain-interface technology. Confused? Well, Pinto is paralyzed from the waist down, and he kicked the ball with his mind, using a robotic exoskeleton. If you think it sounds like something from a science fiction novel, you’re not alone: even Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, who headed the research, once had his doubts.

Shutterstock

Researchers hope to slow down Ebola even more … using robots.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

A robot named da Vinci was born a decade and a half ago. And since then, doctors have used the system to perform more than a million surgeries worldwide. It has revolutionized the way surgeons remove tumors. The next big leap? Da Vinci’s cousins nipping out those tumors before they become a problem.

Shutterstock

The Aspen Ideas Festival in Colorado just wrapped up its opening week devoted to health issues. What were some the top takeaways? Here’s three: robotics, aging and making vegetables sexy.

UTA Project Gives Robots Sensitive Skin

Dec 11, 2012
David Chong / KERA News

Think about robots, and up pop images of soulless automatons made out of metal and circuits. But a team from the University of Texas at Arlington has just won a $1.35 million National Science Foundation grant to give robots sensitive, human-like skin.

Boy Scout Sex-Abuse Files Go Public Today

Oct 18, 2012
Daniel M. Reck / (cc) flickr

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Boy Scout revelations, Halloween political clashes, tweeting the debate and more.