Justin Martin | KERA News

Justin Martin

All Things Considered Host

Justin Martin is KERA’s local host of All Things Considered, anchoring afternoon newscasts for KERA 90.1 & KXT 91.7. 

Justin grew up in Mannheim, Germany, and avidly listened to the Voice of America and National Public Radio whenever stateside. He graduated from the American Broadcasting School, and further polished his skills with radio veteran Kris Anderson of the Mighty 690 fame, a 50,000 watt border-blaster operating out of Tijuana, Mexico. Justin has worked as holiday anchor for the USA Radio Network, serving the U.S. Armed Forces Network. He’s also hosted, produced, and engineered several shows, including the Southern Gospel Jubilee on 660 KSKY.

Justin lives in Dallas with his pets and lovingly cultivates his addiction to coffee, classic video games, and all things technology.

Ways to Connect

Children At Risk

Working parents struggle to find affordable child care in Texas. That's according to new research from Children At Risk, a nonprofit that reports many poor Texas families spend up to 30 percent of their income for child care alone. 

Associated Press

Federal housing vouchers are one of the key ways for a low-income family to pay for a place to live. And landlords have the option to accept or reject those vouchers. In Fort Worth, nearly four out of five landlords contacted wouldn't accept the vouchers -- the highest rate of the five U.S. cities studied.

KERA / Miguel Perez

A six-person team at Texas Woman's University in Denton designed a special type of shirt that targets lower back pain in astronauts. The students created the garment for NASA's Design Challenge Showcase, a competition that pushes students to solve issues related to space travel. 

Dr. Zhijian "James" Chen
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A UT Southwestern Medical Center biochemist was recently named the winner of the 2019 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences for his discovery of an enzyme that helps defend against infections and cancers.

MRI of a brain with Alzheimer's disease
Shutterstock

A radical new vaccine that reduces the two proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease should give the public hope, says the founding director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Michael Zanussi / Flickr Creative Commons

Numerous laws protect people from discrimination when they're searching for a home. But many areas across North Texas and around the country still struggle with patterns of housing inequities and segregation.

UNT

Firewalls, anti-virus software and a whole galaxy of tools are employed to secure our online world. There's a daily, ongoing battle between cybercriminals and the defenders of cyber assets — like Hassan Takabi, a computer science and engineering professor at University of North Texas.

A rendering of the Dallas-Houston bullet train
Texas Central Partners

Plans continue for a bullet train that would connect Dallas to Houston in just 90 minutes. While residents and officials in these big cities welcome high-speed rail, landowners along its path have concerns

Justin Martin / KERA News

The city of Dallas made history this month as the first Texas city to get state recognition for its LGBTQ neighborhood. An official historical marker was installed in front of JR’s Bar & Grill in Oak Lawn.

Courtesy of UT Dallas

Post-traumatic stress disorder — or PTSD — is the most common mental health disorder among veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. It can also affect anyone who experiences a major life-altering event like a serious accident, physical abuse or sexual assault.

The University of Texas at Dallas has received a $7.4 million grant to study this difficult-to-treat disorder — and test out some potentially life-changing treatments.

Jeff Montgomery / AP

It's been just over a month since 26-year-old Botham Jean was shot to death in his own home in Dallas.

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger has been charged with manslaughter. Guyger, 30, she says she mistook his apartment for her own when she shot and killed him on Sept. 6. 

Mary Altaffer, File / AP

The popularity of video games has skyrocketed in the last decade. People who used to play at home with their friends can now play games — such as Fortnite, Dota 2 and League of Legends — professionally and often at sold-out convention centers. 

Allison V. Smith for KERA News

Accross the country the price of rent is leveling off, and in some places it's even dropping. 

A new report from Zillow shows that rents were up just half a percent in July, which appears to be the smallest gain for any month since 2012.

Aaron Terrazas, a senior economist for Zillow, joined KERA to crunch the numbers.

LM Otero / AP

In Dallas, stray and loose dogs are still roaming the streets, particularly on the city's south side. 

Some attacks have resulted in serious injuries — and death. This summer, a man was attacked in far south Dallas by three dogs. In 2016, Antoinette Brown, a homeless Army veteran, was killed in southern Dallas after being mauled by a pack of dogs. 

Parde, C. J., Castillo, C., Hill, M. Q., Colon, Y. I., Sankaranarayanan, S., Chen, J. C., and O'Toole, A. J. (2017, May)

The human face conveys our thoughts and emotions, and we seek it out when trying to identify others. It's also a focal point for the future of identification technology. 

Governments, law enforcement and even businesses are interested in being able to identify people at a distance. 

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Suicide rates have been rising in nearly every state.

It's the 10th-leading cause of death, and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly 45,000 Americans age 10 or older died by suicide in 2016.

Suicide is rarely caused by a single factor. That's why researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas are working on a study that combines an intervention program with a personalized app aimed at teenagers.

Shutterstock

Trying to figure out the future transportation habits for millions of people in a metro area isn't easy; cities often play it safe and go with what's worked before. 

The North Central Texas Council of Governments adopted Mobility 2045, its $135 billion blueprint for the region's transportation needs, earlier this summer.

Courtesy of the University of North Texas

The ability to detect if someone is under the influence of alcohol or some kind of drug is important for many workplaces, for police in keeping intoxicated people off the roads and for hospitals in formulating the right response to a potential overdose.

Courtesy of UT Dallas

A bio-engineering professor at the University of Texas at Dallas has received a half-a-million-dollar grant to further his research into material that could help with human healing. 

Eric Gay / AP

Plans to upload blueprints to the internet for 3D-printed guns are on hold as lawsuits crop up around the country seeking to control their distribution — and as with any new technology, the law is playing catch-up.

Study co-author Maria Nieves Zedeño / School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona

Long before European explorers arrived in the New World, Native American communities used fire to keep warm and to manage the land.

Christopher Roos is an archaeologist at Southern Methodist University and lead author of a new study that looks into how that use of fire affected the ecosystem.

UNT Health Science Center Fort Worth

Losing an arm or leg is devastating, and replacing that missing limb with a prosthetic can be expensive. 3D printing is making it easier to create useable prosthetics quickly and much more cheaply.  

Barbara Woike / AP

With Starbucks and other companies saying they'll eliminate plastic straws, experts are facing a key question: How much of an impact does plastic have on our environment — and on modern life?

Courtesy of North Texas Fair and Rodeo

It’s no State Fair of Texas, but the other major fair in this region, the North Texas Fair and Rodeo in Denton, has dreams of expanding.

LM Otero / AP

To help combat the mental stress that police officers face on the job, the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas has developed a program to help police in Dallas make better decisions.

Craig Ruttle / AP

At least 50 immigrant children under age 5 are expected to be reunited with their parents by Tuesday's court-ordered deadline for the Trump administration to reunify families forcibly separated at the border.

Jenifer Wolf Williams is a trauma therapist based in Richardson. In recent years, she's helped immigrants separated from their loved ones — from families applying for asylum to children who are part of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. 

Brett Chisum / Flickr Creative Commons

Look up into the night sky this July Fourth and you'll certainly see some fireworks, but what goes into making these colorful displays?

Amy Walker is a professor with the University of Texas at Dallas. She has her Ph.D. in chemistry, so she knows a thing or two about the science behind the boom.

Courtesy of UNT Health Science Center

With hot summer days bearing down on North Texas, so are the summer bugs.

Illnesses from mosquito, tick and flea bites have tripled in the U.S., with more than 640,000 cases reported from 2004 through 2016, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control.

Michael Allen, who leads the Tick-Borne Disease Research Laboratory at the UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth, says there are many reasons for the spike.

Courtesty SMU, UCLA

A new study from Southern Methodist University shows that empathetic people — those who are generally more sensitive to the feelings of others — receive more pleasure from listening to music, and their brains show increased activity in areas associated with social interactions.

Courtesy of Drive.ai

One of the nation's first self-driving car services will be coming to North Texas next month. 

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