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Presidential candidate Julián Castro, left, has chosen his brother, U.S. Rep Joaquin Castro, to serve as his campaign manager, which is typically a volunteer position that involves managing big-picture tasks.
Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

Are There Restrictions On How U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro Can Promote His Brother For President?

For his 2020 campaign for president, Julián Castro selected his twin brother, a Democratic representative from San Antonio, as his campaign chairman. Are there rules around Joaquin Castro promoting his brother's run?

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Think

History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd. Monday-Thursday, noon-2 pm; Friday, 1-2 pm on KERA 90.1.

Updated at 11:52 a.m. ET

In 2011, Glynnis Bohannon gave her 12-year-old son permission to charge $20 on her credit card to play a game on Facebook called Ninja Saga. Neither of them saw any signs that the credit card information had been stored and was racking up charges as her son played and made additional in-game purchases. Bohannon says her son didn't realize it would end up costing nearly $1,000.

Selena fans have recently enjoyed a blossoming of memorabilia and media dedicated to the slain singer, and now there's one more item for their collection.

The League of United Latin American Citizens claims a key witness has gone missing in its legal case against the State of Texas and the secretary of state's attempt to purge voters from county registration lists.

LULAC wants former Secretary of State employee Betsy Schonhoff to testify in the case before San Antonio Federal Judge Fred Biery, but they say she can't be found.

From Texas Standard:

As Texas lawmakers begin tackling one of this session's top legislative priorities – school finance reform – a state Senate measure proposes giving public-school teachers a raise. How much money is on the table and what difference would it make for teachers living paycheck to paycheck? It depends on whom you ask and where you live.

Twenty child advocacy groups and nonprofits called on Texas lawmakers this week to increase funding for a struggling program that helps more than 50,000 small children with disabilities and developmental delays in the state.

A couple years ago, Texas had a problem with abandoned oil and gas wells.

It still does.

That was the takeaway Wednesday from a hearing at the state Senate, where lawmakers learned the agency responsible for plugging wells can't seal them as quickly as they're being abandoned.  

Southwest Airlines planes are loaded Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle.
Associated Press

Southwest Airlines is now lashing out at the union representing its mechanics, suggesting that they may be grounding planes to gain leverage in stalled contract negotiations. This comes on the heels of an FAA investigation into faulty baggage weight estimates at the airline and a financial hit from the government shutdown.

flag-draped coffin - veteran suicide
Shutterstock

A recent report from the Washington Post, titled "The Parking Lot Suicides," looks into the disturbing trend of veterans dying by suicide on the property of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. A North Texas nonprofit has developed a program to combat veteran suicides.

Texans, it turns out, don't know their U.S. history. A new study from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation found 63 percent of respondents in Texas failed a quiz based on questions from the U.S. citizenship examination.

Military communities around the country are looking at the potential impact of President Trump’s state of emergency declaration.

The president declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border on Friday to secure up to $8 billion in funding for a barrier on the southern border – more than four times what Congress approved.

In San Diego officials are eyeing the long-term costs of the Trump administration’s decision to pull $3.6 billion of that $8 billion from the military construction budget to use for the wall along the border.

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Latest from NPR

This week, the governor of Connecticut proposed a state-wide tax on sugar-sweetened drinks. Several cities have already enacted such soda taxes in order to raise money and fight obesity. And there's new evidence suggesting that these taxes do work — although sometimes not as well as hoped.

In an unprecedented summit on preventing clergy sex abuse, at the Vatican on Thursday, Pope Francis stood before some 200 participants, and said Catholics are seeking not simply "condemnations" but "concrete, effective measures."

But a crisis that has crossed borders and generations, lacerating the church and shaking the pope's credibility, is standing in the way as he seeks to forge a path ahead.

When an American flees to join ISIS, should they be allowed to come home?

Hoda Muthana left Alabama to join ISIS in Syria after being radicalized online. Now — after the collapse of the extremist group's stronghold in Syria — she's in a refugee camp and wants to return home.

But US President Donald Trump made it pretty clear he doesn't want her back in the country.

Two new accusers have come forward against R. Kelly, claiming that the embattled singer sought to have sex with them when they were minors, more than two decades ago. At a news conference Thursday in New York City, Rochelle Washington and Latresa Scaff related the story of a traumatic encounter that allegedly occurred after one of Kelly's performances in the mid-1990s.

Updated at 6:34 p.m. ET

A federal judge on Thursday barred Roger Stone from talking publicly about his case after an inflammatory photo was posted on his Instagram account of the judge that included what appeared to be a crosshairs.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson rejected apologies offered by Stone, both in writing and in person at a hearing in Washington, D.C. If Stone violates the order, Jackson warned him, she would be "compelled to adjust your environment."

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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JFK In Dallas

KERA stories from that fateful day in November 1963.

Weekdays 10 a.m. on KERA FM