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Santa Fe shooting

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An attorney says a teenager accused of fatally shooting 10 people at a Texas high school last year has been declared incompetent to stand trial by three experts.

The determination means Dimitrios Pagourtzis' trial will be delayed. It had been set to begin in February.

How To Report A Possible Community, School Safety Threat In 10 Minutes

Sep 26, 2019
Eddie Gaspar / The Texas Tribune

iWatchTexas is a reporting system that allows Texans to report potential threats in their communities and schools.

Michael Stravato / The Texas Tribune

In the immediate aftermath of the May 2018 shooting at Santa Fe High School, a man who said he witnessed the carnage seemed to turn up everywhere.

Laura Isensee / Houston Public Media

Sandy Hook. Parkland. Santa Fe.

If it seems like school shootings are becoming more common, there is some data to support that.

From Texas Standard:

A year ago Thursday, a shooter killed 17 students and staff members at a high school in Parkland, Fla. Three months later, it happened again: A gunman killed eight students and two teachers at Santa Fe High School, south of Houston.

In Texas, there's been skepticism over the years about the intentions of those who call for gun control. But one year after Parkland, and almost nine months after Santa Fe, there are small signs of a shift.

From Texas Standard:

Less than a year ago, on May 18, 2018, a shooter killed 10 people and wounded 13 at Santa Fe High School, south of Houston. It's been an arduous nine months for those who are recovering from the traumatic event. One survivor, law enforcement Officer John Barnes who was stationed at the school, was the last person shot that day. He spent weeks in the hospital, had more than six surgeries and has many more months left of rehabilitation.

People react outside the unification center at the Alamo Gym, following a shooting at Santa Fe High School Friday, May 18, 2018, in Santa Fe, Texas.
Associated Press

A growing number of students are leaving the Houston-area school district where 10 people were killed in a mass shooting in May.

Back-to-school shopping has been different this year for Annette Holder, whose son Clayton is an incoming freshman at Santa Fe High School.

The school’s new metal detectors mean more composition books, fewer three-ring binders – or really anything with metal.

David J. Phillip / AP

Texas schools have been adding metal detectors and armed personnel in an effort to improve campus security in response to the deadly May attack at a Houston-area high school that left eight students and two teachers dead.

Among the steps that Texas apparently won't be taking anytime soon is tightening restrictions on gun access for people deemed dangerous to themselves or others.

David J. Phillip / AP

Police officers have long had a presence in public schools. But since the deadly school shootings in Santa Fe and Parkland, Florida, more Texas school children have found themselves facing police for actions the authors of a new study view as kids just being kids.

Lara Solt for KERA News

Across Texas and the country, many campuses conduct active shooter drills. Because school shootings are often perpetrated by students who attend those schools, some raise a concern: Do these drills give potential shooters too much inside information? 

Michael Mond/Shutterstock.com

Governor Greg Abbott's recommendations for increased school safety stems from the May 18 deadly shootings at Santa Fe High School near Houston. The tragedy and the debate over guns has had Dallas resident Aasim Saeed thinking back on his time at the school. 

lev radin / Shutterstock

President Donald Trump began a trip to Texas on Thursday by meeting privately with families of some of the 10 people killed in a school shooting this month.

Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

Fifty-four percent of Texas parents who have children in public schools support arming teachers and other school officials, according to polling numbers from Quinnipiac University released Thursday. 

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET Thursday

Citing a need to make "our schools and our state a safer place," Texas Gov. Greg Abbott unveiled a slate of policy and legislative changes on Wednesday that range from boosting security at schools to doing more to keep guns out of the hands of people who shouldn't have them.

The proposals are part of the Governor's School and Firearm Safety Plan — a list of 40 recommendations for making communities safer. He detailed his new school-safety plan at the Dallas Independent School District's administration building.

Gabriel C. Perez / KUT News

Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday offered several immediate and long-term strategies to improve school safety in Texas. 

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott will announce a plan Wednesday to make Texas schools safer in the wake of the deadly Santa Fe shooting, according to his office.

Eleven days after the shooting that killed eight students and two teachers in a small Texas town, classes are back in session at Santa Fe High School.

Students from the neighboring Alvin school district arrived on school buses today holding signs of support. Others from the community lined the highway to the school.

Grace Johnson, a senior at Santa Fe High School, said she was in the band room when the fire alarm went off last Friday. She got up to evacuate.

“When I walk out into the hallway, I see a kid get shot,” she told Gov. Greg Abbott and others gathered at the Capitol on Thursday for the third in a series of roundtable discussions on school safety. “And he falls. In Santa Fe, we know what guns sounds like ... but you never think it’s going to be in the school.”

As Texas debates what, if any, steps should be taken to prevent mass shootings in the state, we asked our audience what questions they had about guns in schools.

Several hundred people gathered Wednesday night at the Santa Fe Junior High School football stadium to grieve and try to understand the school shooting that killed eight students and two teachers last week.

A group of local pastors organized the service, which they called a “night of hope and healing.”

From Texas Standard.

Following the May 18 mass shooting at Santa Fe High School – and the Sutherland Springs church shooting in November, and the February school shooting in Parkland, Florida – Gov. Greg Abbott convened roundtable discussions about gun violence at the Capitol this week.

Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

As Texans grappled with being the site of America’s latest mass school shooting last week and the seemingly insoluble arguments over gun rights and student safety again flared, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick suggested that preventing future deaths could be a matter of rethinking how schools are built and operated.

The main focus of a roundtable discussion at the Capitol on Wednesday was finding ways for schools to identify violent students before they commit mass murder.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is hosting three roundtable discussions this week in response to the school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas. The first roundtable, held Tuesday, focused on "school and community safety."

The meeting was private, but afterward Abbott read reporters “a list of suggestions and ideas that came out of" the discussions.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott today convened the first of three roundtable discussions on "school and community safety" in response to Friday's school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

In a closed door meeting, Gov. Greg Abbott sat down with fellow lawmakers and other experts Tuesday afternoon for the first day of scheduled roundtable discussions on school safety and gun violence following a massacre at Santa Fe High School last week.

A Pakistani exchange student was one of the 10 people shot dead in the Santa Fe High School shooting on Friday. She came from a country where militants have attacked schools and killed students, so her death — in a country that once seemed so much safer than Pakistan — shocked many in her home country.

Laura Buckman for The Texas Tribune

After 10 people were killed by a student firing a shotgun and a .38 revolver at Santa Fe High School last week, Gov. Greg Abbott's re-election campaign has dropped a shotgun giveaway from his website.

Three days after a shooting at a Texas high school took the lives of eight students and two teachers, a town and a country are trying to figure out what comes next.

Gov. Greg Abbott called for a moment of silence across Texas at 10 a.m. local time, to honor the memory of those who died in Friday's violence in the city of 12,000 between Houston and Galveston.

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