El Paso shooting | KERA News

El Paso shooting

Antonio Basco's wife of 22 years was killed in the mass shooting at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart this month, and her passing means that Basco has no relatives left.

Basco, who runs a mobile car wash business in El Paso, told the funeral home planning the service for his late spouse, Margie Reckard, that he wanted to invite members of the public to attend her visitation.

Since then, the funeral home has been inundated with support from people who never knew Basco or his wife.

Associated Press

Leaders from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border will gather in El Paso Wednesday night to memorialize the 22 people killed this month when a gunman opened fire at a Walmart in the Texas border city.

Jesus Rosales / The Texas Tribune

Less than two weeks after a gunman walked into an El Paso Walmart and killed 22 shoppers, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has launched a Domestic Terrorism Task Force to protect against statewide acts of extremism, his office announced in a Wednesday release.

Many El Pasoans are grieving through their own spiritual and religious traditions following the mass shooting at a Walmart that killed 22 people on Aug. 3. 

A memorial outside the store first began as a few flowers and candles but has grown into a massive display of community support. Dozens of posters line the fence above hundreds of religious candles and people continue to share their own methods of comfort. 

Mallory Falk / KERA News

On Monday, nearly 60,000 public school students in El Paso will start the school year amid an air of mourning, fear and resilience.

The first day of school in El Paso's largest district comes more than a week after a mass shooting at a local Walmart left 22 people dead. According to a police affidavit, the suspect charged in the attack later said he had intentionally targeted "Mexicans."

The gunman who killed 22 people in El Paso specifically targeted Latinos in a city that's nearly 80% Hispanic. A deep fear among some El Pasoans has cast a chilling shadow over their defiant shows of strength and unity. For others, the tragedy offers opportunities to elicit bittersweet smiles, express their love for each other and confront this nation's darkest truths.


A couple draped in U.S. and Mexican flags leave after the mural unveiling ceremony in El Paso.
Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

"I'm the shooter" -- that's what the accused El Paso gunman told officers when he surrendered last weekend. That comes from an arrest warrant affadavit that was obtained today. He also said he targeted Mexicans -- and in a city that's 80% Latino, reporters from The Texas Newsroom have spent the week chronicling a community that's angry, defiant ... and scared.

Stella Chávez / KERA News

I spent last weekend and a few more days reporting from El Paso. Before leaving, I wanted to see the one place I hadn't been to: the makeshift memorial outside the Walmart where 22 people were killed.

Associated Press

Families of those killed when a gunman opened fire at an El Paso Walmart are gathering at funerals on each side of the U.S.-Mexico border to remember loved ones whose lives told the story of the vibrant region.

Melody Stout and Hannah Payan comfort each other during a vigil Saturday night for victims of the El Paso shooting.
Associated Press

Gov. Greg Abbott says Texas needs to do a better job of addressing its mental health care challenges after a deadly mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart.

Associated Press

The man accused of carrying out last weekend's deadly mass shooting at a Walmart in the Texas border city of El Paso confessed to officers while he was surrendering and later explained that he had been targeting Mexicans, authorities say.

Associated Press

As funerals were held Thursday in Mexico for some of the country's citizens who died in the El Paso shooting, a lawyer for the suspected gunman's family said they never heard him express racist views.

unsplash

While the circumstances of every mass shooting are unique, the perpetrators of the recent shootings in Ohio and Texas fit into a consistent storyline: white men with access to guns committing violence in the name of real or perceived grievances.

Associated Press

Walmart is removing from its stores nationwide signs, displays or videos that depict violence following a mass shooting at an El Paso store that killed 22 people.

The massacre in El Paso sent shockwaves across the country, and especially throughout the Rio Grande Valley. People in McAllen held a vigil on Wednesday to honor their fellow border city hundreds of miles away. At the event they expressed defiance and sadness. But they also expressed fear — fear that what happened in El Paso could someday happen to them.


Associated Press

An attorney for the family of the man charged in the El Paso Walmart shooting rampage says the man's mother contacted police weeks before the rampage out of concern that her son had a rifle.

Robert Evans is the manager of the Cielo Vista Walmart in El Paso. He was on duty on the morning of Saturday, Aug. 3, when he saw a man raise a weapon and shoot dozens of people, ultimately killing 22. Houston Public Media’s Andrew Schneider spoke with Evans on the sidelines of an El Paso Chihuahuas baseball game. It was the Minor League team’s first home game since the tragedy.

Warning: This conversation contains graphic descriptions of violence.

Schneider: What can you tell us about what you remember of the day of the attack?

Stella Chávez / KERA News

The makeshift memorial attracts visitors who come to mourn and remember the 22 people who were killed at the nearby shopping complex. Signs of support include flowers and stuffed animals, candles, crosses and religious items.

Jesus Rosales / The Texas Tribune

Days after a white gunman murdered 22 people in El Paso in a shooting fueled by racism, Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday said that he will hold another series of roundtable discussions to consider legislative proposals to address the tragedy.

Associated Press

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump visited the University Medical Center of El Paso, visiting with survivors of the weekend shooting that killed 22 people.

In El Paso, emotions are still raw after a mass shooting at a Walmart left 22 people dead — many of them Mexican and Mexican-American.

A vigil in El Paso on Monday celebrated the life of Javier Amir Rodriguez, age 15 — the youngest victim of Saturday's mass shooting at a Walmart.

There were three high-profile shootings across the country in one week: The shooting in Gilroy, Calif., on July 28, and then the back-to-back shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, this past weekend.

That's no surprise, say scientists who study mass shootings. Research shows that these incidents usually occur in clusters and tend to be contagious. Intensive media coverage seems to drive the contagion, the researchers say.

Fact-Checking 6 Myths About The Perpetrators Of Mass Shootings

Aug 6, 2019
Becker1999 / Flickr

Mass shooters killed 31 people last weekend in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, and three people in Gilroy, California, last month, including two children. The week was the deadliest for mass shootings and fatalities this year, whichever way one chooses to count them.

Updated on Aug. 7 at 2 p.m. CST

Community members gathered for a vigil in El Paso on Monday night to honor the youngest victim of the mass shooting at a Walmart store on Saturday.

Dozens and dozens of people waited for hours at the Texas Capitol building to give blood during a donation drive Monday. The We Are Blood event was inspired by the need for blood in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, even though the blood donated here will stay in this area.

Associated Press

Like most retailers, Walmart is accustomed to the everyday dealings of shoplifters. Now, it's confronting a bigger threat: active shooters.

Three days after a man opened fire at one of its stores in El Paso and left at least 22 dead , the nation's largest retailer is faced with how to make its workers and customers feel safe.

Associated Press

A survivor of last weekend's mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso says his 15-year-old nephew was fatally shot as they tried taking cover in the store.

El Paso is a border town with a predominately Hispanic population and a culture linked to both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. And now the community feels like it is being targeted because of that.

A couple draped in U.S. and Mexican flags leave a rally in El Paso following the shooting. They'd just seen a mural unveiled by the family of a victim from last year's shooting in Parkland, Florida.
Stella M. Chávez / KERA

Gun violence dominated the weekend as at least 22 people were killed by a gunman in El Paso – and nine more were shot to death 12 hours later in Dayton, Ohio. Monday on Think, host Krys Boyd got an update from El Paso, and experts shared their thoughts on gun violence and the anger of young, white men.

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