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Politics

Your North Texas voter guide for the November 2021 election

Straight-On Row Of Voting Booths At Polling Station
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From where to vote to what's on the ballot, here are some key things to know for the upcoming election.

This year's Nov. 2 ballot includes eight amendments to the Texas Constitution, plus several city and school district propositions. Find out what's on your ballot.

Let's get started with the basics.

How to vote, when to vote?

How can you vote by mail?

The last day to apply for a ballot by mail is Oct. 22. Here's how you do that.

To be eligible to vote early by mail in Texas, you must be one of the following:

  • 65 years or older
  • Sick or disabled
  • Out of the county on election day and during the period for early voting by personal appearance
  • Confined in jail, but otherwise eligible.

What do you need to vote in person?

VoteTexas.gov has everything you need to know about what to bring to vote in person.

Seven forms of acceptable ID to vote in Texas
VoteTexas.gov

One of seven forms of ID will get you into a voting booth:

  • Texas driver's license
  • Texas election identification certificate (EIC) issued by the Department of Public Safety
  • Texas personal ID card issued by DPS
  • Texas handgun license issued by DPS
  • U.S. citizenship certificate containing your photograph
  • U.S. military ID card containing your photograph
  • U.S. passport, book or card

What if you don't have one of the seven acceptable forms of voter ID?

The state lists other forms of identification, like a utility bill or birth certificate, that you can use to vote if you don't "possess an acceptable form of photo identification, and cannot reasonably obtain one."

In addition to presenting that secondary form of ID, you'll also need to fill out a "Reasonable Impediment Declaration" form.

What if you're a voter with special needs?

A person of your choice or an election worker can assist you at the polls — but the person cannot be your employer or someone who represents your employer, or an officer or representative of your union.

If you're physically unable to enter the polling location, you can vote curbside. Send someone into the polling location to request an election worker meet you at the curb. If you're planning on arriving alone, call ahead to your county's elections office.

Need a ride to vote?
Voters will be able to take some free rides through public transportation during the voting periods for the November election. Click here for more information.

Where to vote

Early voting started Oct. 18 and ends Oct. 29. You can also vote on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 2, from 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Click on your county below to find an early voting or election day polling place.

Collin County

Dallas County

Denton County

Tarrant County

What's on the ballot?

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Texans have the chance to vote on eight amendments to the state constitution. What would each amendment actually do? Find out here.

COUNTY ELECTIONS
Tarrant County’s bond election includes two propositions — Proposition A for $400 million in bonds for streets and roads and Proposition B for $116 million to build and equip new offices for the district attorney’s office. Find more details on the propositions here.

CITY ELECTIONS
Richardson: A $190 million bond package for streets, public buildings, sidewalks, drainage and parks is up for approval.

Lewisville: Voters will decide whether to issue $95 million in bonds for public safety facilities.

Mesquite: The mayor and all six city council seats are up for grabs. Click here for the list of candidates.

SCHOOL DISTRICT ELECTIONS
Allen ISD: Voters will decide on two bond propositions totaling $23.6 million. Funds would cover updates to several facilities, turf and track improvements at Allen ISD athletic facilities and the addition of turf and track at Ford Middle School. More details can be found here.

Highland Park ISD: A proposition seeks approval of a one-year property tax. Details can be found here.

Fort Worth ISD: The district has four propositions on the ballot totaling almost $1.5 billion that will, among other things, address renovations at the district’s middle schools and a new elementary school in Benbrook.

Got a tip? Email Domini Davis a dhDavis@kera.org.

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