Bonnie Petrie | KERA News

Bonnie Petrie

Bonnie Petrie is a proud new member of the news team at WUWM. She is a reporter who - over her twenty year career - has been honored by both the Texas an New York Associated Press Broadcasters, as well as the Radio, Television and Digital News Association, for her reporting, anchoring, special series production and use of sound.

Bonnie is a native of northern New York, growing up along the Canadian border. She spent nearly fifteen years living and working in Texas. She is also a podcaster, known, in particular, for her series of podcasts for pregnant women and new mothers called Pea in the Podcast.

A mother of one daughter, Bonnie lives in Shorewood.

Big white tent complexes in two Texas border towns are drawing attention. These are temporary courtrooms, the latest effort by the Trump administration to more quickly work through thousands of migrant asylum cases.


It's been five months since San Antonio opened its Migrant Resource Center downtown, and in that time tens of thousands of asylum-seekers have spent time in San Antonio before moving on to their final destinations. 


Asylum-seeking migrants often make it to San Antonio without having the opportunity to bathe for weeks beforehand. Similarly, there are residents of San Antonio who don't have access to clean water. 


The Department of Defense is funding research in San Antonio to see if a new vaccine can prevent birth defects in babies of women exposed to the Zika virus during pregnancy. 

 


The lives of women in San Antonio are more violent than those of women in other Texas cities, and an increasing number of women in the city are dying from that violence.


The recent death of a Guatemalan child after a flu outbreak at the Customs and Border Protection Centralized Processing Center in McAllen is unsurprising, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.


Measles and mumps have shown up in Texas, and both are preventable if children get the MMR vaccine. But some doctors are concerned that people may be not be aware of the third illness included in the MMR vaccine acronym. The R stands for rubella, also known as German measles.

Scientists from UT Health San Antonio are among the select few who have expanded their research to include the final frontier.

Texas received an F when it comes to lead levels in drinking water at schools, according to the Texas Public Interest Research Group and Environment Texas Research and Policy Center. That was the same grade it got in 2017. Texas was among 22 states that received the failing grade.

Tucked inside a nondescript building in a residential neighborhood in northwest San Antonio is a little cafe. However, here the coffee doesn't come in Italian sizes, and the guests provide the music. Welcome to a memory cafe.

Researchers in San Antonio are recruiting people with mild cognitive impairment for a nationwide study to see if nicotine improves symptoms.

The study is called the MIND study -- Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing.

A Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientist is helping develop a test for the Zika virus that has been called “a lab on a chip.”


Updated Jan. 18.

While public health experts are working furiously to quell the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, researchers in San Antonio have made a discovery that might be a key to improving treatment.


Texas has reported the most cases nationwide of a mysterious polio-like illness in 2018.

The Department of State Health Services said there were 27 cases of acute flaccid myelitis throughout the state. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that Ohio had the next highest number of cases with 12.


Stockings all over the country were stuffed with home DNA testing kits that people will be sending in this month, adding to an already huge genetic database for companies like 23andMe.

 

What happens with that information?


The Guatemalan boy who died in U.S. custody on Christmas Eve had the flu. The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator has confirmed 8-year-old Felipe Gomez Alonzo tested positive for Influenza B, though his precise cause of death has not been officially determined.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than a quarter of all Hispanic children are obese, and a San Antonio researcher has received a $3 million grant to figure out why.

 


Two-year-old Zainab Mughal has neuroblastoma and will need blood transfusions during her treatment. But the little girl has a genetic variation in her blood that makes finding a compatible donor extremely difficult. Ross Herron, the chief medical officer of the West Division of American Red Cross Blood Services, said there is a lot more to blood compatibility than just type.

 


A San Antonio researcher seeks new treatments for schizophrenia while a San Antonio man strives to live a life of purpose with the disease.


It's a tale of two diseases. Researchers at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute are trying to figure out if being infected with malaria can help a person infected with Ebola fight off the disease.


How could a parent forget their child in the car? That is a question people ask every summer as dozens of children die in hot cars, forgotten by their parents.


A pointy-headed professor. A hand-painted heron. A steel fist rising in the air. These are all works of American art, of a sort — but you can't go to a museum to see them. You go to your local bar or craft brewery.

They're examples of beer tap handles, a business that's expanded in tandem with the explosion of growth in the craft beer industry. As craft brewers try to make their brews stand out in an increasingly crowded field, they're driving the expansion of a singular business: custom-made snazzy beer taps.