Andrew Weber | KERA News

Andrew Weber

Andrew Weber is a freelance reporter and associate editor for KUT News. A graduate of St. Edward's University with a degree in English, Andrew has previously interned with The Texas Tribune, The Austin American-Statesman and KOOP Radio.

Like a mirage on a sun-beaten West Texas highway, the future of autonomous vehicles in Texas isn't altogether clear. A new state effort hopes to remedy that.  

President Donald Trump's Hail Mary offer to trade protections for recipients of the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program for border-wall funding could be dead on arrival as Congress heads back to work this week.

A new report from BuzzFeed News accuses President Donald Trump of directing his longtime attorney Michael Cohen to lie to Congress, and Joaquín and Julián Castro have called for impeachment proceedings or the president's outright resignation. 

A plaque honoring the Confederate States of America in the Texas Capitol will be taken down after a vote from the Texas State Preservation Board.

In a meeting that lasted all of three minutes, board members unanimously approved the measure to remove the plaque, which was installed in 1959, though it's unclear when exactly it will be taken down. 

Since 2007, Houston Democratic state Rep. Garnet Coleman – and others – have tried in vain to get just five words into Texas' hate crimes law: "or gender identity or expression."

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A plaque honoring the Confederate States of America in the Texas Capitol could come down Friday with a decision from the Texas State Preservation Board.

The board is meeting at 10:30 a.m. to discuss removing the plaque, which was installed near the Capitol rotunda in 1959.

In Austin, and elsewhere, 2018 was the year of the scooter. Love them or hate them, they're all over the city's streets (and sidewalks) and they're here to stay – at least for now.

Now, a snapshot from the city gives more insight into where users rode scooters in 2018.

Days after a federal lawsuit was filed in Pflugerville, Texas faces another suit over its 2017 law requiring contractors to pledge they won't boycott Israel – this time from the American Civil Liberties Union.

An investigation by the University of Texas into allegations that Georgetown state Sen. Charles Schwertner sent inappropriate texts to a grad student has found the senator did not violate university policy or Title IX.

The student alleged the Republican senator, who won re-election in November, initially engaged with her over LinkedIn after meeting at an event on UT campus. Schwertner, the accuser said, then solicited sex over text and sent an unwanted sexual image, what the sender called "proof of life."

Gustavo "Gus" Garcia, a former Austin school board trustee, City Council member and the first elected Hispanic mayor of Austin, died early Monday surrounded by his family. He was 84.

A Round Rock-based speech pathologist is suing the Pflugerville Independent School District over a 2017 state law that required her to pledge allegiance to Israel, which, she argues, violates her First Amendment right to free speech.

A lawsuit challenging the City of Austin's decision to rename Manchaca Road will go to trial. 

A Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit is suing the Texas Department of Public Safety over its automatic driver license-suspension program. The suit alleges the state's Driver Responsibility Program has unconstitutionally suspended 1.4 million Texans' licenses for failure to pay fines.

Austin is ordering dockless scooter operator Lime to pull 1,000 scooters from its fleet after the city alleges Lime violated its agreement with the city.

A memo from the Austin Transportation Department says it ordered Lime to cut its 5,000-scooter fleet by a fifth on Tuesday. ATD Director Rob Spillar said Lime violated the terms of the city's agreement by rolling out more than 500 scooters in the downtown area.

It's not Turkey Day without turkey, but let's be honest: Genetics aside, your shared love of stuffing and cornbread is pretty much the only connective tissue binding you and that one cousin who drank seven Bud Lights last year and tried to explain blockchain to your grandmother.

For residents of the Rio Grande Valley, immigration is more than an election issue. It doesn't ebb and flow with the tides of politics; it is embedded in the lives of people who live there.

Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt issued a local disaster declaration Thursday after flooding damaged properties along Highland Lakes.

The Lower Colorado River Authority is advising residents along Lake Travis to be wary of rising water as levels at Lake Travis are forecast to reach near-record highs.

UPDATE 9/23/18: Cody Wilson was booked into the Harris County Jail this morning. According to jail records, his bail is set at $150,000.

ORIGINAL STORY: Cody Wilson, founder of the Austin-based, 3D-printed gun design firm Defense Distributed, has been arrested in Taiwan. 

Austin police issued an arrest warrant Wednesday on charges that Wilson sexually assaulted a 16-year-old girl last month in North Austin. According to the warrant, the teen said she had sex with the 30-year-old, whom she had met on SugarDaddyMeet.com, in exchange for $500.

Cody Wilson, founder of the 3D-printed gun firm Defense Distributed, has been accused of sexual assault of a minor last month, a second-degree felony. In a press conference today, the Austin Police Department said the self-styled "radical libertarian" and gun-rights activist was last seen in Taipei, Taiwan and that he missed a flight back to the United States.

Winston Churchill once said, “It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations.”

Winston Churchill did not, in fact, once say, “The fascists of the future will call themselves anti-fascists.”

It’s safe to say many an Austinite woke up today, looked at the forecast and, possibly, wondered what fresh, near-literal hell they’d unknowingly stumbled into during their Sunday night slumber. It’s hot.

But, hey, at least there’s conditioned air, because before that, people went to some pretty strange lengths to save themselves (and their horses) from the immutably oppressive sun.

Ken Paxton is taking on the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The embattled watchdog agency – which was established in the wake of the financial crisis to police financial service providers – is seeking penalties against Mississippi-based payday lender All American Check Cashing, alleging it misled customers.

Paxton and 13 other states filed a brief arguing the CFPB doesn't have constitutional authority to levy penalties.

As Texas debates what, if any, steps should be taken to prevent mass shootings in the state, we asked our audience what questions they had about guns in schools.

At least 10 people are dead today after a gunman opened fire at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas. Witnesses say the gunman entered Santa Fe High School shortly before 8 a.m. and opened fire with a shotgun, killing multiple students. A student resource officer responding to the shooter was also seriously injured.

Officials found explosive devices on-campus and off-campus as well. Those devices were rendered safe by police.

Dockless vehicle providers now have rules for operating in Austin after a City Council vote early this morning, giving providers a framework to deploy dockless bikes and scooters legally by as soon as next week.

The unanimous vote rolls dockless vehicles into a city ordinance banning abandoned vehicles from blocking rights-of-way like sidewalks and sets up a framework to penalize dockless vehicles operating illegally in Austin.

Interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley called the Austin serial bomber a "domestic terrorist" at a panel hosted by member station KUT on Thursday.

Interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley called the Austin serial bomber a "domestic terrorist" at a panel hosted by KUT this morning. 

Despite previous calls from the community after a string of bombings killed 39-year-old Stephan House and 17-year-old Draylen Mason, Manley hadn't used the term. At the panel, he said he’s now “very comfortable” calling Mark Conditt a terrorist.

Williamson County has ruled the death of serial bomber Mark Conditt a suicide. 

Conditt died after detonating an explosive device as police closed in on him in Round Rock early Wednesday. He is believed to be responsible for a series of bombings in Austin this month that killed Stephan House and Draylen Mason and seriously injured four others. 

Interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley says Austin bombing suspect Mark Conditt recorded a 25-minute video confession hours before his death early this morning.

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