Ebola in Dallas | KERA News

Ebola in Dallas

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On Sept. 30, 2014, the United States had its first diagnosis of the Ebola virus. Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian national, tested positive for the virus days after he was initially sent home from a Dallas emergency room. Many questions arose since that fatal diagnosis: how two nurses contracted the virus from Duncan, the ability of Texas Health Presbyterian to keep its workers safe, whether Duncan received proper medical care, and more.

Here you’ll find KERA’s coverage of events, including radio stories, live blogs, and a timeline detailing what happened that fall.

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[We will update this story throughout the day.] The financial impact of Ebola on Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has been significant. Net revenue is down 25.6 percent – or $8.1 million -- in October compared to the first nine months of 2014, according to financial disclosure forms released Wednesday afternoon.

When It Came To Ebola, Control Eluded Texas Leaders

Oct 22, 2014
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

When the Ebola virus first arrived in Texas, Gov. Rick Perry greeted the grave news with trademark swagger.

“There is no place in the world, I will suggest to you, that has better professionals, better ability to address this, than in Texas,” he said at a hastily called press conference, one day after Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan tested positive for Ebola while in isolation at a Dallas hospital.

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[We will update this story throughout the day.] The condition of Nina Pham, the first Dallas nurse infected with Ebola, has been upgraded to good from fair, the National Institutes of Health announced Tuesday afternoon.

Emory University Hospital/YouTube

Federal health officials on Monday issued new guidelines to promote head-to-toe protection for health workers treating Ebola patients.

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There is no drug to treat Ebola that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. But there are companies selling products claiming to do just that.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Yesterday was the first Sunday at Our Lady of Fatima Church since Nina Pham, the first nurse to become infected with the Ebola virus, was transferred from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to Maryland for continued treatment.

Updated at 5:31 p.m. ET

It's Monday, and Ebola still dominates the headlines. Here's a roundup of some of the latest developments:

Duncan's Family Completes 21-Day Quarantine:

A health care worker who had self-quarantined herself aboard a Carnival Cruise Lines ship has tested negative for Ebola and was allowed to disembark with the rest of the passengers in Galveston, Texas, on Sunday.

In a statement, the Galveston County Health Authority said it had determined "there is no evidence of a public health threat to cruise passengers or to Galveston county."

In a full-page letter published in Sunday's Dallas Morning News, Barclay Berdan, the CEO of the company that owns Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, said the hospital was "deeply sorry" for missing the ebola diagnosis of Thomas Eric Duncan.

Cooper Neill/Texas Tribune

Fear and reactions to the Dallas Ebola cases are making news around the country.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Frontline, which airs on PBS and KERA-TV (Channel 13), takes a closer look at how Ebola spread through Africa with this interactive map.

How many times do top officials have to say that the Ebola virus is not airborne?

A lot, apparently.

Here is President Obama Thursday: "This is not an airborne disease. It is not easy to catch."

And the day before: "It is not like the flu. It is not airborne."

And Friday, a reporter asked the inevitable question about airborne Ebola when Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, held a press briefing about nurse Nina Pham's transfer to the National Institute of Health.

Cooper Neill/Texas Tribune

Dozens of Texas Health Presbyterian workers who entered Thomas Eric Duncan’s hospital room have been told not to enter public places.

Texas Tribune livestream

[We will update this post throughout the day.] A cruise ship with a Dallas health care worker aboard who's being monitored for signs of Ebola did not receive clearance to dock in Cozumel, Mexico.

YouTube/Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital

On Thursday, Nina Pham departed Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital for the National Institutes of Health in Maryland. Before she left, her physician, Dr. Gary Weinstein, recorded a conversation with her. Pham asked Presbyterian to share the video. Watch it below.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

On Monday, early voting begins in Texas.  If you haven’t heard a lot about it, that might be because the evolving Ebola crisis in Dallas has overwhelmed news coverage -- even in one campaign where the Ebola response seems to be the issue.

Texas Health Resources / Twitter

Dozens of Dallas health care workers who had contact with the man who died from the Ebola virus have been asked to sign legal documents in which they'll agree to stay home.

Christina Ulsh / KERA News

The first nurse to contract Ebola is being moved to Maryland to make room at Texas Health Presbyterian in case there are other Ebola patients in Dallas, County Judge Clay Jenkins told KERA.

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A Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital nurse said hospital workers were not prepared to handle Ebola before Thomas Eric Duncan arrived in late September. The nurse, Briana Aguirre, spoke with NBC’s “Today” show Thursday morning.

Max Geron/Dallas Police Department / Twitter/@MaxDPD

[For Thursday's Ebola developments, click here.] The second Dallas nurse who has Ebola arrived in Atlanta Wednesday evening. Television footage showed Amber Joy Vinson leaving a plane and boarding an ambulance. 

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The medical director of disaster preparedness for Dallas County's public hospital system says staff members were disheartened to learn of a second nurse with Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas contracting Ebola.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Amber Vinson, the second Dallas nurse to contract Ebola, lives in the Village Apartments, just a couple miles south of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.  It’s the biggest apartment complex in Dallas, with more than 10,000 tenants.

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After two of the nurses who treated Thomas Eric Duncan became sick with Ebola, their colleagues across the state are expressing concerns about preparation for handling Ebola. 

Sana Syed / City of Dallas

There’s a four-legged character in this Ebola drama who’s captured a lot of hearts – Nina Pham’s dog, Bentley. Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings has vowed that the dog will be cared for. We know a lot about how the Ebola virus is spread in humans, but what about the virus and dogs? 

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As the medical community fights to contain Ebola, the virus is also challenging another field: the law. Today on Think, Krys Boyd asked a panel of attorneys about some of the legal questions surrounding Ebola.

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[We will update this post throughout the day.] Federal health officials say they've identified 76 hospital workers who may have been exposed to the first Ebola patient in Dallas.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Close friends of the young health care worker diagnosed with Ebola describe her as a nurse with passion. On Monday night, they prayed for her.

Samaritan's Purse

A Dallas nurse who has Ebola has been given plasma to fight the virus taken from the blood of a doctor who beat the disease.

Texas Health Resources

About 70 staff members at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital were involved in the care of Thomas Eric Duncan after he was hospitalized, according to medical records his family provided to The Associated Press.

City of Dallas/Animal Services / Twitter/@dallasshelter

What will happen to the dog of Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse who contracted the Ebola virus?

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