Health/Science/Tech | KERA News

Health/Science/Tech

Every week, KERA explores the latest in health, science and technology in North Texas through two main series, Vital Signs and Breakthroughs.

Charts at UNT Health Science Center's Human Movement Performance Lab.
Credit Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

Vital Signs

In Vital Signs, Sam Baker taps into the expertise of local health care leaders to provide insight into your everyday health and well-being.

Breakthroughs

In Breakthroughs, KERA reporters delve into the latest health-related technologies developed in North Texas and across the state. From the Zika virus to fried chicken, no scientific topic is off limits. 

Learn more in-depth multimedia projects: Surviving Ebola, a look at how Ebola made its way to Dallas and the lessons local hospitals and governments learned; Growing Up After Cancer, the journey of one North Texas boy with cancer; and The Broken Hip, an in-depth look at how a fall can change everything. 

surroundsound5000 / (cc) flickr

The idea of counties expanding Medicaid with the Affordable Care Act is getting some traction in North Texas. Governor Perry has said the state won’t do it.

Dynamic Aviation King Air

It appears aerial mosquito spraying over Dallas worked. City officials say there were no West Nile infected mosquitoes in a small sample of traps retrieved afterwards. That’s good preliminary news, but Dallas City Council members want better planning for next year’s West Nile virus season.

As student athletes begin a new school year, players, staff and parents need to be mindful of staph infections.  They’re the result of bacteria we all have on our skin and in nasal passages. But the director of primary care sports medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center says contact sports raise the potential for an infection. Dr. Robert Dimeff explains in this KERA Health Checkup.

Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control are in Texas this week trying to figure out why West Nile Virus is so prevalent in the Lone Star State.

The Centers for Disease Control put North Texas at the center of a national conference call on West Nile Virus. While Dallas, Fort Worth is clearly the most infected area in the country… the reason why, is not so clear.

New guidelines for how Texas public and charter schools should handle students with food allergies took effect August 1. In this KERA Health Checkup, Dr. Drew Bird of Children’s Medical Center talked  about the need for state guidelines when many schools have food allergy response plans in place.


Tonight, beginning at 8:30 p.m. Dallas County will continue aerial spraying for mosquitoes carrying the West Nile virus.

Aerial spraying for mosquitoes over Dallas County cities is cancelled for tonight.

At a Saturday afternoon update, County Judge Clay Jenkins said the chance of rain and windy conditions are keeping the planes on the ground until Sunday, Monday and Tuesday nights.

Friday night, storms cut short the spraying effort. Only about 30% of the intended area was sprayed. Planes will hit the remaining 70% Sunday night. Monday and Tuesday spraying will be a second application over the entire targeted area.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings has declared a state of emergency because of escalating West Nile virus cases and deaths.

Parkland Hospital is ready to put another new name on the top office door. Parkland’s Board is expected to name a hospital turnaround expert as the new Interim CEO.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Some Dallas County cities are getting ready to launch aerial mosquito spraying, to combat West Nile virus. School districts are also faced with protecting students from the disease-carrying mosquitoes.

Sean McCann / (cc) flickr

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins expects a majority of cities north of I-30 will sign on to aerial spraying for mosquitoes – the carriers of West Nile virus.

UT Southwestern

The quintuplets born at UT Southwestern Medical Center are all in stable condition, doctors said at a press conference today alongside the babies' parents and older brother.

dr_relling / (cc) flickr

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings says he’ll meet with other officials early this week to discuss aerial spraying for mosquitoes carrying the West Nile Virus.

Too much time in the sun can be dangerous if you’re not careful – and well beyond a sunburn. The National Cancer Institute says more than a million Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer every year. But dermatologist Dornechia Carter says skin cancer is often curable if it’s caught early. She talked with Sam Baker about skin cancer in this KERA Health Checkup.

Tim Baker / flickr

Dallas County is reporting an eighth death from West Nile virus.

Andre.abu / flickr

Dallas County Commissioners are rejecting a call from the local medical society for immediate aerial spraying for mosquitoes as the number of West Nile cases climbs. 

Sean McCann / (cc) flickr

Denton County is reporting its first death from West Nile Virus. Health officials say the patient was in his 90’s and had underlying health issues. He lived in Denton.

rp4prez2008 / (cc) flickr

Early Friday evening Dallas County Health and Human Services confirmed the county’s sixth death related to West Nile Virus.

Sean McCann / (cc) flickr

The city of Rowlett is among those reporting increases in human cases of West Nile Virus.

Laurie Holloway / Children's Medical Center

A five-year old North Texas child with leukemia recently visited Capitol Hill. His family and Children’s Medical Center in Dallas wanted to put a face on healthcare funding for kids.

photosavvy / Flickr.com

Many in the medical community favor breastfeeding for the physical benefits it offers both mother and child. But not every woman can do so. In this KERA Health Checkup, Kathy Chaney, a nurse and lactation consultant at Baylor University Medical Center, talks about alternatives for women who can’t or should not breastfeed.

rp4prez2008 / (cc) flickr

Dallas County reports a third death from West Nile Virus. The patient lived in Grand Prairie. Health officials say all three victims had the more serious neuroinvasive strain of the mosquito-transmitted illness.

Wheeler Cowperthwaite / flickr

Over the past 8 years, there’s been an almost 40 percent increase in people living with HIV in Dallas County. That’s according to a new study by the Texas Department of State Health Services. 

UT Southwestern Medical Center

With Type-2 diabetes, the body’s ability to produce needed insulin declines. Doctors often recommend lifestyle changes and the drug metformin after an early diagnosis. But an eight year study by U.T. Southwestern Medical Center has found early intensive treatment of insulin and a drug regimen may be a better strategy. In a KERA Health Checkup, the author of the study, Dr. Ildiko Lingvay, talks about the results.

Andre.abu / flickr

A second West Nile virus death is reported in Dallas County.  

Andre.abu / flickr

A Dallas man who lived near downtown is this year’s first West Nile virus fatality in Texas, and most likely in the country.  

UT Southwestern

More than five million Americans have Alzheimer’s, a mind-robbing disease without a cure. And that number is expected to triple as baby boomers age.

DISD: Immunize Now

Jul 16, 2012

Immunizations are required for all Texas public school students. District leaders say now’s the time to get the required shots, or your child could be turned away from class.

jimtimimages / flickr

Governor Rick Perry is turning down a state health insurance exchange and expansion of Medicaid. Those are two key provisions in the federal health care overhaul.

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