Agriculture | KERA News

Agriculture

Matt Slocum / AP

Every year, people flock to the State Fair of Texas to try the latest fried creation, catch the Red River showdown, or take a ride on the skyway, but a big swath of the fair is also dedicated to livestock. People from across the state and beyond gather to compete in shows for sheep, goats, cows and more.

With a deadline looming and pressure on lawmakers escalating, a large bipartisan, bicameral conference committee gathered on Capitol Hill Wednesday for the first formal negotiations of the Farm Bill.

Many on the committee — which includes a whopping 56 conferees — reiterated that it is imperative that work on the new Farm Bill be completed this month — before the current one expires on Sept. 30.

But the biggest sticking point between the competing House and Senate bills has to do with changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, often called food stamps.

Study co-author Maria Nieves Zedeño / School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona

Long before European explorers arrived in the New World, Native American communities used fire to keep warm and to manage the land.

Christopher Roos is an archaeologist at Southern Methodist University and lead author of a new study that looks into how that use of fire affected the ecosystem.

Calsidy Rose

The Trump administration on Tuesday announced up to $12 billion in emergency aid for farmers impacted by the president’s trade war — which came as welcome relief for Texas farmers who were afraid the tariffs would hurt their business. But some Texas lawmakers have criticized the move and called on the president to end the tariffs.

Shutterstock

The 73-year-old Masonic Temple in Downtown Dallas will soon be getting a major makeover. The building’s new owners, Stephanie and Hunter Hunt, will turn the 43,000 square foot building into a hub of creativity.

NOAA George E. Marsh Album / National Weather Service (NWS) Collection

Could another Dust Bowl bury drought-prone states like Texas again?  That’s a question raised by a Ken Burns documentary airing last night and tonight on PBS.  In it eyewitnesses recall the terrifying clouds of dust that blanketed Texas and surrounding states in the 1930s.

Texas agriculture officials say the historic drought has caused record-breaking crop and livestock losses estimated at $7.62 billion for 2011.