Rick Holter | KERA News

Rick Holter

Vice President of News

Rick Holter is KERA's vice president of news. He oversees news coverage on all of KERA's platforms – radio, digital and television. Under his leadership, KERA News won 30 awards last year, six of them from national journalism organizations. In 2017, the station won its first-ever national Edward R. Murrow Award for a video in its series One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life. He and the KERA News staff were also part of NPR's Ebola-coverage team that won a George Foster Peabody Award, broadcasting's highest honor.

Rick returned to Dallas in 2012 after six years at NPR, where he edited the shows Weekend All Things Considered and Day to Day, and supervised the Digital News operation. Before that, Rick spent 15 years at The Dallas Morning News, after editing stints at what was then the St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times) in Florida and the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.

In addition to the Peabody, he’s collected honors including USC-Getty Arts Journalism Fellowships in 2005 and 2011, a National Headliners Award (2010), a NLGJA Award (2009) and numerous newspaper design awards. He also edited and designed a Pulitzer Prize-winning feature series (1992). A graduate of the University of Maryland, he grew up on a dairy farm in Middletown, Md.

Ways to Connect

AP photo

A billionaire businessman rises from celebrity to the presidential stage, shaking up the establishment and raising nostalgic hopes about making America great again. Nearly three decades ago, that described Ross Perot, the plain-talking Texan who died Tuesday at age 89, leaving a lasting political legacy.

Associated Press photos

Texas hasn't gone blue in a presidential race since 1976, but a new poll indicates that at least early on, it could be a 2020 battleground. The latest survey from Quinnipiac University shows former Vice President Joe Biden with a four-point edge over President Trump in a hypothetical one-on-one matchup.

On election night, State Rep. Eric Johnson led a crowded field of nine candidates for Dallas mayor. He'll face City Council member Scott Griggs on June 8.
Bill Zeeble / KERA News

A busy weekend of local elections brought clarity in Fort Worth — where the mayor and the entire City Council were re-elected — and in Arlington, where the mayor coasted to an easy win. But in Dallas, things are murkier, at least until the June 8 runoff.

Miguel Perez / KERA News

When the Texas Legislature gavels into session next week, Julie Johnson will make history. She'll be one of Dallas County's first two openly gay legislators — and the first state House member with a same-sex spouse.

Jim Cowsert / Associated Press

Adrian Beltre, the third baseman whose defensive wizardry and infectious personality animated the Texas Rangers for the past eight years, retired Tuesday.

Mesquite Friendship Baptist Church

Terry Turner lives at the intersection of religion, history and politics. The pastor of Mesquite Friendship Baptist Church comes out of the deep traditions of the African-American church, and he's past president of the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention.

Janne Räkköläinen/Flickr

The Daily, the hit podcast from The New York Times, makes its debut on the radio in North Texas on MondayHost Michael Barbaro sat down with KERA to talk about what he's learned since the podcast launched in January 2017.  

Vote Common Good

Doug Pagitt doesn't think the words "conservative" and "evangelical" have to go hand in hand.

He's an evangelical Christian pastor from Minneapolis who heads an effort called Vote Common Good. Pagitt and his compadres are on a marathon bus tour across the country encouraging voters in battleground Congressional districts to elect Democrats on Nov. 6.

Verne Lundquist

When Cowboys tight end Jackie Smith famously dropped a third-quarter touchdown pass during Super Bowl XIII in 1979, what sports anchor Verne Lundquist yelled out solidified the moment in sports history.

"Bless his heart! He's got to be the sickest man in America!"

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Texas's 33rd Congressional District looks like a misshapen barbell, stretching from Fort Worth to North Dallas and Oak Cliff. Farther south, the city of Austin includes slices of six different districts.

Shutterstock Photo Illustration

(Editor's note: This story includes graphic details of a sexual assault that some may find disturbing.) 

In the summer of 2006, 16-year-old Amber Wyatt said she was was raped by two of her classmates at Martin High School in Arlington. She reported the crime almost immediately. No one was ever prosecuted.

O'Rourke: Richard W. Rodriguez/AP; Cruz: AJ Mast/AP

Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and his Democratic challenger U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, face off Friday night in the first of three debates. 

This matchup has become one of the most closely watched in the 2018 midterm election season, as Cruz tries to hold off O'Rourke and what Democrats hope will be a "blue wave."  

Miguel Perez / KERA News

Fort Worth has set an ambitious goal: to have every third grader reading on grade level by 2025. That's the key milestone for a public-private effort called Read Fort Worth, which just hired a new executive director, Anel Mercado.

LM Otero / AP

As the Dallas heat wanes and people start emerging from their air-conditioned homes, the search to find a comfortable park nearby can be a challenge. 

Michael Graczyk / AP

In nearly 46 years of reporting for The Associated Press, Mike Graczyk has seen at least 429 Texans go to their deaths in Huntsville.

That's almost a third of all the inmates executed in the United States since the Supreme Court reaffirmed capital punishment in 1976.

Lara Solt / KERA News special contributor

The Texas Education Agency has released new A-F grades for school districts. Some school leaders call the new rating system misleading. They say the letter grades simplify a complex issue. 

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

One of the nation's most prominent Latino organizations has a new leader, and he's a familiar face to North Texans.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

One of the iconic figures in North Texas news made some news himself this week.

WFAA-TV anchor John McCaa announced he'll retire next spring after 34 years at Channel 8. McCaa shares his experience and what he’s looking forward to in retirement in this week's Friday Conversation.

John Locher / AP

The future of transportation seems jam-packed with high-tech gizmos, like bullet trains, self-driving cars, flying taxis and Hyperloop.

And yet, the future in North Texas still belongs to cars, at least if you dig into "Mobility 2045," the long-term transportation roadmap for the area.

Reynaldo Leal / The Texas Tribune

Hundreds of kids are still separated from their migrant parents, despite Thursday's deadline for the Trump administration to reunite families.

Investigative reporter Neena Satija has been following one of those families — Marcos, Sandy and their four children — for the Texas Tribune and Reveal. Satija talked with KERA about what she learned while reporting the story. 

Allison V. Smith for KERA News

One of the biggest surprises from the "Still On The Edge" series showed up early in Courtney Collins' reporting process. When she sat down to review data, she saw a 16 percent drop in median income in Dallas County over a six year period. In Texas, the drop was around 2 percent.

She wasn't the only one surprised by those numbers.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

For someone seeing downtown Dallas for the first time, it's hard to believe: a half-mile-wide swath of open land, almost in the shadows of the skyscrapers. And yet, Dallas has never figured out what to do with this massive green space.

Abbott: Sue Ogrocki; Valdez: Richard W. Rodriguez / AP

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott and his Democratic challenger, former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez, have agreed — to a point — to debate at least once this fall.

And if the event comes off as proposed on Sept. 28, there will be some stiff competition: Friday night football and the first day of the State Fair of Texas.

Google Maps screenshot

There's a big, chunky building with tiny, obscured windows along Bryan Street in Old East Dallas that is a bit of a mystery. A pair of reporters think they've unraveled some of that mystery.

Courtesy of Silvana Pagliuca

Friday is the rare off day in one of biggest sporting events on Earth.

The World Cup starts its Round of 16 this weekend, and one North Texan spent the last three weeks following soccer teams and fans across Russia.

Lawrence Schiller (courtesy Lawrence Schiller Archives), 1968

The drama on the U.S.-Mexico border the last few weeks has eerie echoes from a half-century ago, when then-U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy went to Mississippi.

What he saw — brutal poverty, especially among children — sparked what historian and author Ellen Meacham calls a "Delta Epiphany." 

Samantha Guzman / KERA News

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz announced Monday that he will introduce a bill called the "Protect Kids and Parents Act" to keep what his statement calls "illegal immigrant families" together while their cases are being heard.

That's very different from what he told KERA's Krys Boyd earlier this month.

A federal judge issued a ruling Tuesday afternoon that could fundamentally reshape one of the most influential companies in Texas.

Judge Richard Leon said telecom giant AT&T will be able to merge with Time Warner after all, despite opposition from the Trump administration.

Courtesy of Miguel Solis

Olivia Solis has spent her entire life in the hospital. The three-month-old baby was born with a congenital heart defect. She's had multiple surgeries; the latest to close her chest after an extremely rare infant heart transplant.

Lara Solt / KERA Special Contributor

A few years back, the Dallas school district came up with an ambitious plan to save failing schools. Accelerating Campus Excellence, or ACE, pours money and the best teachers and principals into struggling schools. With Fort Worth, Garland and Richardson borrowing the idea for their failing schools, can ACE work on a larger scale?

Pages