Norma Martinez | KERA News

Norma Martinez

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra.

While researching the farm worker movement, filmmaker Laurie Coyle came across several black and white photos. One woman, who appeared frequently in the photos, was later discovered to be Maria Moreno (00:17). And a new book of original song collaborations tell the stories of San Antonio West Side’s oldest residents (15:50).


The West Side of San Antonio is predominantly poor and Hispanic, and has a reputation for being crime-ridden. But many of its residents wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

Many of the West Side’s oldest residents have stories to tell, but historians normally don’t come knocking on their doors. Their stories are now compiled in “Still Here: Homenaje al Westside de San Antonio.


Andrés Manuel López Obrador is Mexico’s newest president. The 65-year-old populist painted himself as a champion for Mexico’s poor.

Jorge Valencia, KJZZ’s senior field correspondent, was in Mexico City for Saturday’s inauguration. He said López Obrador laid out a laundry list of issues he hopes to accomplish in the next six years, including fighting corruption in the Mexican government.


Poor neighborhoods in many cities are experiencing urban renewal. As a result, many long-time residents of those neighborhoods can no longer afford to live in the homes they have known for generations.

Yolanda Chávez Leyva, an associate professor of history at the University of Texas at El Paso, specializes in the history of the border and said residents of El Segundo Barrio managed to save their neighborhood from developers in 2006. That’s when the Paso del Norte group announced a downtown revitalization plan.


William Henry Ellis was born a slave in Victoria, Texas, in 1864 — a year before slavery was abolished in the state.

Ellis was able to take advantage of his proximity to the border — and his light complexion — to reinvent himself as Mexican businessman, Guillermo Enrique Eliseo.

John Phillip Santos, a San Antonio writer, journalist, and filmmaker, attended San Antonio Fiesta events as a child. His grandmother pointed out  that “ ‘This was a celebration of the defeat of the Mexicans,’ ” Santos said.


  

This week on Fronteras: 

  •  A major push to register Hispanics to vote finds many  of them struggle to make ends meet in their everyday lives.
  •  Border Land Act would protect owners from Trump Administration land grabs for border wall.
  •  President Trump’s decision to lower the number of refugees welcomed in the U.S. threatens the viability of resettlement agencies.
  •  A major toymaker wants to cash in on a pricey Hispanic rite of passage with the Quinceañera Barbie.

 

The trans community was recently in the spotlight when the Texas legislature attempted to pass its so-called bathroom bill in the Senate.  SB6 would have required individuals to use restrooms in public schools and government buildings that align with the gender on their birth certificate.  That bill and a subsequent bill in the special session failed to make it to the governor’s desk.

Trans children face other challenges other than just figuring out which bathroom to use.  TPR’s Norma Martinez recently attended an event in San Antonio that served to educate and celebrate the trans community.