2018 elections | KERA News

2018 elections

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Surging voter-registration numbers are one sign that the bitter partisan fight over Brett Kavanaugh's appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court is energizing voters on both sides of the aisle.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Voters in the Dallas school district and others in North Texas will decide on tax ratifications elections, or TREs, this November.

These tax measures, which have becoming increasingly popular ballot items in the last decade, are meant to generate millions more for school districts, but not all of them pass. 

Mike Pence in Dallas to campaign for Pete Sessions
Christopher Connelly/KERA

Vice President Mike Pence came to Dallas on Monday to campaign for a pair of Republican incumbents, U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions and U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Both are facing tough Democratic challengers.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

Tuesday is the last day to register to vote in the November elections in Texas. It’s also the last day to update your address if you’ve moved since the last time you voted.

President Trump has prayed with evangelicals in the White House. He's nominated judges they like to federal courts, and granted their wish of moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem. For the president's evangelical supporters, he has been a godsend.

And now he has a request for them: Get out the vote in November's midterm elections.

But religious leaders on the left are also inspired to get their people to go the polls.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Tuesday’s the last day to register to vote in Texas, and a record’s already been set: More than 15.5 million Texans are eligible to vote, with registration continuing to climb. But being able to vote and actually pulling the lever are not the same thing. 

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Texas's 33rd Congressional District looks like a misshapen barbell, stretching from Fort Worth to North Dallas and Oak Cliff. Farther south, the city of Austin includes slices of six different districts.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

EL PASO — Former President Barack Obama has endorsed 11 Texas Democrats leading up to next month’s midterm elections. But none go by the popular four-letter moniker “Beto”.

Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson for The Texas Tribune

Vice President Mike Pence is visiting Dallas on Monday to campaign for U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions, according to a White House official.

Abby Livingston / The Texas Tribune

Two people were taken to the hospital Tuesday after a "white powdery substance" was sent to the Houston campaign office of U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, according to authorities who said the powder turned out not to be hazardous.

Former President Barack Obama weighed in on the midterm election conversation Monday, endorsing 260 candidates in federal and state races across the country.

That brings the former president's list of endorsed candidates for November's midterms, all Democrats, to over 300, as he released a tranche of endorsements in August as well.

Debate between Gov. Greg Abbott and Democratic challenger Lupe Valdez, in Austin
Laura Skelding for The Texas Tribune

Lupe Valdez, the Democratic nominee for governor, swung away at Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in their first and only debate Friday evening, while Abbott largely ignored her and defended his first term.

Why Is The Center Missing From Texas Politics?

Sep 28, 2018

From Texas Standard:

During these highly partisan times, you might be wondering, what happened to the political center? What happened to that willingness to work together despite party affiliation to get things done? Experts agree the center is definitely not holding. And they’re not sure when it’s going to come back.

AP

Gov. Greg Abbott and Democratic rival Lupe Valdez face off in tonight's live, one-and-done gubernatorial debate.

AP

The close U.S. Senate race in Texas has overshadowed Republican Gov. Greg Abbott's bid for a second term.

Ivan Pierre Aguirre: O'Rourke/Bob Daemmrich: Cruz / via Texas Tribune

The Sunday debate between Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, has been postponed due to weekend U.S. Supreme Court confirmation votes on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and his closest challenger, former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez, take the stage in Austin tonight for the first and only debate between the candidates.

O'Rourke: Richard W. Rodriguez/AP; Cruz: AJ Mast/AP

About the only thing U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke have in common is how long they've served Texans in Washington. Both first got elected to Congress in 2012. Six years later, Cruz, a Republican, is up for re-election and O'Rourke, an El Paso Democrat, is vying to unseat him.

JORGE SANHUEZA-LYON / KUT

Public radio stations in Texas want to know what you want to know about the 2018 elections.

What topics do you want to hear more from the candidates about? Is education at the top of your list? How about roads, or taxes, or the environment?

Let us know and we'll do our best to give you as much information as possible before you head to the polls.

Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News/Pool Photo

At their first debate in Texas’ 2018 U.S. Senate general election campaign, U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, and incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz, a Republican, traded blows Friday over a range of issues that included immigration and criminal justice. 

Tom Fox / The Dallas Morning News via AP, Pool

It was more duel than debate Friday night in Dallas as Republican Sen. Ted Cruz and Democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke went after each other from the start. Snappy and heavy on snark, Cruz and O’Rourke held nothing back in the first of three debates.

Tom Fox / The Dallas Morning News via AP, Pool

Guns, the Second Amendment, school shootings and this month's shooting death of Botham Jean were all testy topics for Ted Cruz and Beto O'Rourke during Friday night's U.S. Senate debate at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

O'Rourke: Richard W. Rodriguez/AP; Cruz: AJ Mast/AP

Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and his Democratic challenger U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, face off Friday night in the first of three debates. 

This matchup has become one of the most closely watched in the 2018 midterm election season, as Cruz tries to hold off O'Rourke and what Democrats hope will be a "blue wave."  

The Texas Senate race wasn't supposed to be competitive this year. But thanks to an imaginative campaign, Beto O'Rourke has energized Democrats, drawing huge crowds and raising tens of millions of dollars in what was initially seen as a long-shot bid to defeat Republican Sen. Ted Cruz.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Republican Pete Flores' upset victory in a Democratic-friendly Texas Senate district Tuesday night has spurred GOP jubilation and Democratic soul-searching with less than two months until the November elections.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera: O'Rourke/ Bob Daemmrich: Cruz

U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, leads Republican incumbent Ted Cruz by 2 percentage points among likely voters, according to an Ipsos online poll released Wednesday in conjunction with Reuters and the University of Virginia. O’Rourke has been closing the gap over the last several months, but this is the first poll that puts him ahead of Cruz.

You've probably heard about the “blue wave” that’s forecast to sweep U.S. elections this November. Some expect it to flip dozens of congressional seats from red to blue, turning control of the U.S. House over to Democrats. And there’s even a slight chance that Democrats could win enough seats to take control of the U.S. Senate.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera: O'Rourke/Bob Daemmrich: Cruz / Texas Tribune

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, leads his Democratic challenger Beto O'Rourke by 9 percentage points among likely voters, according to a new poll from Quinnipiac University.

Credit Marjorie Kamys Cotera, Texas Tribune: O'Rourke / Robin Jerstad, Texas Tribune: Cruz

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and his Democratic challenger, U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke of El Paso, have agreed to three debates before Election Day.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Republican lawmakers in the Texas Senate were sitting pretty last year. Now, with less than two months until Election Day, they are finding that keeping that supermajority in the Senate is no longer a sure thing.

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