Top Stories: Record Heat Expected To Die Down This Week; Disparity In Liver Cancer Rates | KERA News

Top Stories: Record Heat Expected To Die Down This Week; Disparity In Liver Cancer Rates

Jul 23, 2018

The top local stories this morning from KERA News:

North Texas endured record-breaking heat throughout the weekend with temperatures as high as 110 in some areas.

Fortunately, this week, the heat won't be quite as bad, according to Matt Stalley with the National Weather Service in Fort Worth.

“We will be slightly less hot. I wouldn't say cooler, but we will be less hot this week thanks to a very weak cold front that's in the area this morning,” Stalley said. “So we will be hovering right around the century mark through most of the week as opposed to around 110."

Stalley said there's a low chance of isolated showers in parts of the region this evening, but he doesn't expect a decent shot at rain until later next week. He said temperatures this week will be more in line with a typical Texas summer.

“But the record-breaking heat that we've had the past few days was pretty exceptional and something that we only really see once every five to 10 years or so here.”

The National Weather service advises wearing light, loose-fitted clothing and staying inside where there is air-conditioning to avoid heat-related illnesses.

Other stories this morning:

  • In today’s Vital Signs, KERA’s Sam Baker discusses the ongoing increase in cases of liver cancer in the U.S. Researchers studied records of 1,100 patients diagnosed at Parkland and UT Southwestern Medical Center and found racial and ethnic differences in outcomes: Blacks and Hispanics are less likely than whites to get early diagnosis and curative treatment, and Blacks less likely to survive. Baker talked to Dr. Amit Singal of UT Southwestern, who said much of this disparity stems from lack of access to screening for the disease.

You can listen to North Texas stories weekdays at 8:22 a.m. and 6:20 p.m. on KERA 90.1 FM.