Border & Immigration | KERA News

Border & Immigration

The civil rights group indicated the state could be putting tens of thousands of U.S. citizens on a pathway to be dropped off voter rolls
Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

 

As U.S. immigration enforcement becomes stricter under the Trump administration, more immigrant families are cutting ties with health care services and other critical government programs, according to child advocates who work with these families.

In Texas, researchers studying the issue say it's a major reason why more children are going without health insurance.

Voters in Houston arrive to cast ballots during the last hour of voting in the primaries on March 6, 2018.
Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

 

The Southwest Workers Union and members of the San Antonio community gathered Friday to protest Fox News’ “Battle at the Border,” a town hall event centered on border security and immigration issues.


A sign directs passengers to different terminals inside the closed Terminal B at George Bush Intercontinental Airport  Jan. 15 in Houston. The security checkpoint inside the terminal has been closed for several days.
Associated Press

With many federal workers in Texas having been without a paycheck during the 35-day partial government shutdown, local organizations and agencies are continuing to help. Though President Donald Trump promised back pay during his address Friday, furloughed workers are still in need. 

Updated at 1:15 a.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday night he won't be looking for an alternative place to give the State of the Union address. Earlier in the day, asked about House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., insisting he could not speak on the House floor until a partial government shutdown is over, the president said, "We'll do something in the alternative."

The Trump administration's treatment of more than 10,000 immigrant children held in custody at shelters across the nation is coming under intense scrutiny. Numerous lawsuits claim the government is using the system of child confinement as a way to punish and deport kids and their families.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves the chamber after speaking about his plan to move a 1,300-page spending measure, which includes $5.7 billion to fund President Donald Trump's proposed wall along the U.S.-Mexico border
Associated Press

House Democrats are putting forward a new proposal to end the government shutdown, aiming to lure President Donald Trump away from his demand for a border wall by offering billions of new dollars for other border security measures.

President Donald Trump's Hail Mary offer to trade protections for recipients of the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program for border-wall funding could be dead on arrival as Congress heads back to work this week.

Democrats and immigrant rights groups were quick to oppose President Trump's proposal to end the government shutdown over the weekend because it includes $5.7 billion for an expanded border wall.

Now that they've seen the full language of the bill, they've found other reasons not to like it.

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence visit the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, Monday, Jan. 21, 2019, in Washington. After 31 days, Democrats and Republicans appeared no closer to ending the partial government shutdown.
Associated Press

Thirty-one days into the partial government shutdown, Democrats and Republicans appeared no closer to ending the impasse than when it began, with President Donald Trump lashing out at his opponents after they dismissed a plan he'd billed as a compromise.

For nearly a year before family separation became an official and controversial policy of the Trump administration in the spring of 2018, federal immigration agents separated "thousands" of migrant children from their parents. That's according to a government watchdog report released Thursday.

Pedestrians and cars cross from Mexico into the U.S. at the Paso del Norte Port of Entry near downtown El Paso on Jan. 15, 2019.
Jorge Salgado for The Texas Tribune

 

As the government shutdown approached its fifth week and Washington Democrats and President Donald Trump showed no signs of coming to an agreement on how to end the stalemate Tuesday, U.S. Border Patrol vehicles could be seen patrolling just north of the Rio Grande near El Paso’s Paso del Norte bridge.

Aerial view of the tent city at the Marcelino Serna Port of Entry in Tornillo on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018.
Ivan Pierre Aguirre for The Texas Tribune

 

The tent city popped up over the summer, about 40 miles from El Paso, as the U.S. government sought more space to hold hundreds of unaccompanied teenagers caught crossing the Rio Grande from places like Honduras and Guatemala. It was supposed to be a temporary solution, but a one-month contract to operate the camp stretched to two months, then three, then into the holidays as its population swelled.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott took his oath of office on Tuesday. In his speech he promised lower taxes and school funding overhaul.
Associated Press

Republican Greg Abbott began a second term as Texas governor Tuesday by promising lower taxes and a school funding overhaul but without mentioning a national policy dispute that weighs heavily on his state: President Donald Trump's demand for a border wall.

President Trump spoke to the centennial gathering of the American Farm Bureau Federation Monday, cultivating ties to rural voters who were a key factor in his 2016 election.

"I'm proud to be a great friend of the farmer," Trump said, addressing the group's convention for the second year in a row.

The president drew applause as he recounted administration efforts to reduce regulation and save the very wealthiest farmers from the estate tax.

If you want to cook up a battle over private property rights in Texas, here’s the recipe:

Take a handful of sprawling cities and growing populations that are expanding into once-rural areas, add a booming oil and gas industry with a desperate need for new pipelines to move record-high volumes of hydrocarbons, and sprinkle in the new electric lines needed to power both of those trends.

teen migrants walk in line inside the Tornillo detention camp in Tornillo, Texas.
Associated Press

The nonprofit group running what once was the largest U.S. detention camp housing migrant teenagers says the last children have left the facility.

From Texas Standard:

Texas Standard has been inviting new members of the Texas delegation on Capitol Hill for on-air meet-and-greet sessions. Recent news has made these conversations especially timely: earlier this week we spoke about the shutdown and the situation at the border with a newly minted Democratic representative, Colin Allred. Now it's Lance Gooden's turn; he's the Republican freshman elected in November to take the place of Jeb Hensarling representing District 5, which covers parts of Dallas and East Texas.

Gooden says he supports President Donald Trump's idea to declare a national emergency in order to secure funding for the border wall. He says Trump would need to do that "especially if he wants to get what he wants because I don't think he's gonna get it in Congress."

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick attends a Donald Trump rally on Aug. 23, 2016, in Austin.
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

 

President Donald Trump gestures after arriving at McAllen International Airport on Thursday.
Associated Press

President Donald Trump arrived in on the Texas border in McAllen to make the case for his long-promised border wall after negotiations with Democrats blew up over his funding demands.

Trump traveled on Thursday on the 20th day of a partial government shutdown. He is seeking to use the trip to bolster his argument that a wall is needed on security and humanitarian grounds.

President Trump says if he doesn't get a border wall he will declare a national emergency to build a border wall.
Associated Press

President Trump says he is willing to declare a national emergency unless Democrats go along with his demands for $5.7 billion for a border wall.

Updated Jan. 10 at 3:50 p.m. ET

The U.S. government has been operating under a partial shutdown since Dec. 22. The shutdown, driven by a political battle over President Trump's demand that Congress approve funds for a wall along the border with Mexico, is touching the lives of Americans in myriad ways.

As the U.S. continues with a partial government shut down over the funding of a border wall, President Trump took his case straight to the American people. But some believe Trump’s argument for the wall is at odds with the realities of the southern border.


From Texas Standard

President Donald Trump addressed the nation Tuesday night. It was rumored that he would declare a national emergency as a means of moving ahead with construction of a border wall, despite Congress' unwillingness to provide the funding – that conflict is what led to the current partial government shutdown. But in his address, though he did argue for the importance of constructing a wall, he not declare an emergency.

Democratic U.S. Congressman Henry Cuellar represents Texas' 28th District, which runs from South San Antonio into the Rio Grande Valley, and covers a large stretch of Texas' border with Mexico. Cuellar says the president's arguments about the need for a border wall are wrong.

Workers replace sections of the border wall in Tijuana, Mexico.
Associated Press

As President Donald Trump travels to the border in Texas to make the case for his $5.7 billion wall, landowner Eloisa Cavazos says she knows firsthand how the project will play out if the White House gets its way.

President Trump used his first prime-time address from the Oval Office to make the case for his controversial border wall. The president's demand for $5.7 billion in wall funding — and Democrats' opposition — has led to a partial shutdown of the federal government.

Here we check some of the arguments made by the president and top Democrats in their response.

Trump's Speech

Claim 1: Humanitarian and security crisis

"There is a growing humanitarian and security crisis at our Southern border."

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., pose for photographers after speaking on Capitol Hill in response President Donald Trump's address, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Washington.
Associated Press

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer gave the Democratic response to President Donald Trump's remarks to the nation Tuesday night on his proposed wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

President Donald Trump speaks from the Oval Office of the White House as he gives a prime-time address about border security Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2018, in Washington.
Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP

President Donald Trump made a somber televised plea for border wall funding Tuesday night, seeking an edge in his shutdown battle with congressional Democrats as he declared there is "a humanitarian crisis, a crisis of the heart and a crisis of the soul."

A listener wrote: "What ethical calculus has been used to decide that NPR will broadcast POTUS live?"

He was referring to President Trump's Oval Office address tonight, his first from that venue. It is expected to be on the topic of immigration and his demand, as part of the negotiations to end the partial government shutdown, for funding for some kind of barrier on the southwest border.

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