Mallory Falk / KERA | KERA News

Mallory Falk / KERA

Reporter

Mallory Falk covers El Paso and the border for the Texas news hub, the prototype for NPR's new system of regional journalism hubs. Previously she worked as a reporter at KRWG in Las Cruces, New Mexico, and WWNO, New Orleans Public Radio. Her reporting has aired nationally on programs including Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Here & Now. A winner of multiple regional Edward R. Murrow awards, Mallory is based in El Paso, and is part of the national Report for America project, which aims to support journalists in underserved areas of America.

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Mallory Falk / KERA News

Mexico is the second deadliest country in the world for transgender people, according to a recent study. Yet many LGBTQ migrants are stuck in the border city of Ciudad Juárez. 

Associated Press

In El Paso, a grand jury indicted the alleged gunman who killed 22 people at a local Walmart. The North Texas man is charged with capital murder.

Shutterstock

Plano Senior High School and El Paso's Eastwood High School face off in a highly-anticipated football game Thursday night — it comes a month after the mass shooting in El Paso.

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Dallas-Fort Worth TV station WFAA announced Tuesday it will broadcast next week’s high school football game featuring Plano Senior High and El Paso's Eastwood High School of El Paso.

This game almost didn’t happen.

Stella M Chávez, KERA News

On Aug. 3, 2019, a shooter at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, took the lives of 22, injured over two dozen and changed a whole community. The shooting was the worst targeting Latinx in modern U.S. history.

But as some survivors begin to process the horror, there might be a glimmer of hope: Those without a green card may now be eligible for a special visa, designed to protect crime victims. 

Attendees to Wednesday night's community memorial service in El Paso, at the Southwest University Park stadium stand for the national anthem.
Jonathan Levinson / OPB

Some survivors of the mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart may be eligible for a special visa designed to protect victims of crime.

Earlier this month, Margie Reckard, 63, was gunned down along with 21 others in the El Paso, Texas, massacre that authorities believe was driven by racial hatred. Two weeks later, strangers amassed by the hundreds to honor Reckard and surround her widower, Antonio Basco.

Jonathan Levinson / OPB

Wednesday night, thousands of El Pasoans streamed into Southwest University Park, for a community memorial to honor the 22 victims of the mass shooting that took place just over a week ago, on Aug. 3.

Mallory Falk / KERA News

On Monday, nearly 60,000 public school students in El Paso will start the school year amid an air of mourning, fear and resilience.

The first day of school in El Paso's largest district comes more than a week after a mass shooting at a local Walmart left 22 people dead. According to a police affidavit, the suspect charged in the attack later said he had intentionally targeted "Mexicans."

On Monday, nearly 60,000 public school students in El Paso, Texas, will start the school year amid an air of mourning, fear and resilience.

The first day of school in El Paso's largest district comes more than a week after a mass shooting at a local Walmart left 22 people dead. According to a police affidavit, the suspect charged in the attack later said he had intentionally targeted "Mexicans."

In El Paso, emotions are still raw after a mass shooting at a Walmart left 22 people dead — many of them Mexican and Mexican-American.

A vigil in El Paso on Monday celebrated the life of Javier Amir Rodriguez, age 15 — the youngest victim of Saturday's mass shooting at a Walmart.

Updated on Aug. 7 at 2 p.m. CST

Community members gathered for a vigil in El Paso on Monday night to honor the youngest victim of the mass shooting at a Walmart store on Saturday.

Mallory Falk / KERA News

The crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border has galvanized some American religious communities. Many congregations have thrown themselves into sheltering and advocating for migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. But the issue has also divided some churches.


Associated Press

The Trump administration is expanding its power to quickly deport certain undocumented immigrants. A fast-track process known as “expedited removal” allows immigration authorities to deport some people without a hearing in front of a judge.

Mallory Falk / KERA News

A crowd has gathered outside Centro de Atencion Integral a Migrantes in Ciudad Juarez. This is where migrants come to check their number on a long list of asylum seekers. 


Associated Press

The number of migrants taken into custody after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border dropped last month for this first time this year. About 104,000 migrants were taken into custody in June, down 28% from May, giving local shelters a small break from the overwhelming conditions just weeks ago.

El Paso Police Department / Twitter

A woman was shot inside the El Paso Health and Human Services building Wednesday after an hours-long standoff with a SWAT team.

About a dozen members of the Hispanic Congressional Caucus toured three migrant detention facilities near El Paso on Monday as part of an investigation.

Dr. Eugene Marciniak recently examined about a dozen patients at a Catholic retreat center in Las Cruces, N.M. He set up shop at a corner table in the cafeteria and called families over one by one: a mother with belly pain, a child with a low-grade fever, a teen girl with a cracked and possibly infected tooth. They had just been released from government custody and were staying at the center for a night or two before joining relatives in other parts of the United States.

News last week that a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl died shortly after being apprehended by U.S. Customs and Border Protection has brought the nation’s focus back to the U.S.-Mexico border. That includes the tent city in Tornillo, Texas: a facility the federal government erected in June to house migrant children who recently crossed the border. The Tornillo site was supposed to be temporary, but it’s continued to expand. Over the weekend, a congressional delegation toured the site and called on the government to shut it down.

 

 


 

The U.S. says it has reunited more than 500 migrant children that the government separated from their parents. That means there are about 2,000 children to go. Officials say they have a plan, though parents and their advocates tell a different story.

On Sunday, a Department of Homeland Security bus pulled up outside Annunciation House, a shelter for migrants and refugees in El Paso, Texas. Parents filed off and walked into the shelter. Some wore their pant legs rolled up, exposing GPS ankle monitors.

It's a Saturday morning, and school marching bands are playing for a crowd. But they're not in a Mardi Gras parade. They're in the Superdome, where 120 schools are set up at long tables, putting their best faces forward and trying to recruit families.

One gives on-the-spot instrument lessons, another is showing off it's step team.