Mallory Falk / KERA | KERA News

Mallory Falk / KERA

Reporter

Mallory Falk covers El Paso and the border for KERA as part of The Texas Newsroom. That's a regional news hub linking stations across the state, the prototype for NPR's Collaborative Journalism Network. Previously she worked as a reporter at KRWG in Las Cruces, New Mexico, and WWNO, New Orleans Public Radio. Her reporting has aired nationally on programs including Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Here & Now. A winner of multiple regional Edward R. Murrow awards, Mallory is based in El Paso, and is part of the national Report for America project, which aims to support journalists in underserved areas of America.

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Rex Nelson said that Fourth of July fireworks show cancellations have led to booming sales.
Keren Carrion / KERA News

Fourth of July fireworks shows across Texas have been canceled or modified due to COVID-19.

Courtesy of Emma Chalott Barron

For weeks, Emma Chalott Barron had been riddled with anxiety, wondering how the U.S. Supreme Court would rule on the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Tony Guttierez / Associated Press

The El Paso Independent School District’s board of trustees voted 5-1 Tuesday to rename Robert E. Lee Elementary School.

Paul Ratje for KERA News

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, Hotel Flamingo in Ciudad Juarez has been filling up with guests.

Mallory Falk / KERA News

Mother’s Day this Sunday will be extra special for families spanning the U.S.-Mexico border. This year, Mexico’s Mother’s Day, which is always celebrated on May 10, falls on the same day as the American holiday. 

Mallory Falk / KERA News

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration has effectively sealed off the border to asylum seekers and restricted immigration. One change affects migrants who have been sent to wait in Mexico as their asylum cases play out in U.S. immigration court as part of the “Remain in Mexico” program, officially known as the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP).

Detainee in an ICE facility
Associated Press

El Paso leaders are calling for Immigration and Customs Enforcement to release nonviolent detainees in the region, to protect them from COVID-19.

“In a sober way, now we see how each of our destinies are really intertwined and how every one of us really is our brother’s keeper,” said Mark Seitz, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of El Paso, at a virtual press conference Tuesday.

A young Honduran boy held by his father wears a mask while waiting in line with others at the bridge.
Paul Ratje for KERA News

It was still dark when Alejandra arrived at the Paso del Norte International Bridge in Juárez, Mexico, around four in the morning. She and her 13-year-old daughter sat near the turnstile and waited for officials to let everyone through.

The Otero County Processing Center
Mallory Falk / KERA News

As the number of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. continues to climb, medical experts are turning their attention to immigration detention centers. 

Immigration attorney Taylor Levy stands near a port of entry in Ciudad Juárez, where she offers legal advice to asylum seekers on their way to U.S. immigration court.
Mallory Falk / KERA News

To slow the spread of COVID-19, the federal government has recommended social distancing. Most of America has hunkered down, but U.S. immigration courts remain open.

Mallory Falk / KERA News

When presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders held a recent campaign rally in El Paso, it made sense to kick things off with the beloved local band Sparta. 

The group played a few songs as people took their seats in a downtown concert hall. Then frontman Jim Ward addressed the crowd.

As Access To Asylum Narrows, These Alternatives Are Some Immigrants’ Only Hope

Feb 10, 2020
migrants crossing Rio Grande
Mani Albrecht / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

For most migrants fleeing violence or persecution, getting asylum protections in the U.S. has never been easy. 

When U.S. Rep. Veronica Escobar delivers the Spanish-language rebuttal to President Trump's State of the Union address Tuesday, she'll do so from a community health center in her hometown of El Paso, Texas.

The first-term Democrat was thrust into the spotlight last year, as her city became a testing ground for Trump administration immigration policies and the site of the deadliest attack on Latinos in modern U.S. history.

Migrant family at International Bridge 1
Fernando Llano / Associated Press

Since taking office in 2017, President Trump has worked to dramatically reshape the country’s immigration system and curb migration at the U.S.-Mexico border. This year, his administration implemented sweeping changes that experts say effectively seal off the southern border to most asylum seekers. 

Protest signs at the El Paso airport.
Mallory Falk / KERA News

If you're flying through El Paso International Airport this holiday season, you may notice several protesters, holding signs that say things like “de-ICE the planes” and “this airport deports refugees.” 

Mallory Falk / KERA News

The Otero County Processing Center is a squat, beige facility surrounded by desert, about 30 minutes outside El Paso, in Chaparral, New Mexico. Last fall, a group of volunteers drove out to the site, to meet with some of the asylum seekers detained there.

The Otero County Processing Center
Mallory Falk / KERA News

When Jesús Enrique Rodriguez Mendoza turned himself in to immigration officials, he figured he would be detained but assumed it would be for a short time. Instead, he spent nearly two years in an El Paso detention facility.

For several nights this month, searchlights have been illuminating the sky on the U.S.-Mexico border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. They don't have anything to do with stepped-up border enforcement. Instead, they're part of a binational art installation that aims to connect people on both sides of the Rio Grande.

Children's artwork adds color to a tent encampment near the Paso del Norte International Bridge.
Mallory Falk / KERA News

A growing number of Mexicans are fleeing their homes and heading to the U.S. border to seek asylum, driven by a surge in violence. But once they get to a port of entry, many of them are blocked.

El Paso Shooting memorial rendering
Walmart

The reopening of the El Paso Walmart where 22 people were killed in an August mass shooting has been pushed back. The renovated store will now open its doors on Nov. 14, about a week later than originally planned.

A makeshift memorial
Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Texas has seen four major mass shootings in the last two years. Despite conversations in communities and at the statehouse, little has changed in the state. But after gunmen killed 29 people in two West Texas shootings in August, state leaders called for “meaningful action” and formed special committees in the Texas house and senate. Their charge: come up with policies that will reduce mass violence.

Mark Lambie/The El Paso Times via AP

The 21-year-old suspect in the fatal shooting of 22 people at a Walmart in El Paso pleaded not guilty Thursday during a brief initial hearing.

Police have said Patrick Crusius of Dallas confessed to the Aug. 3 mass shooting and that he targeted Mexicans.

Mallory Falk / KERA News

Luis Orozco Morales had made the trip many times between his home in Hobbs, New Mexico, and El Paso. But this time, when he tried to pass through a remote Border Patrol checkpoint, he was arrested and detained by the Border Patrol, despite having paperwork that showed he was allowed to remain in the United States.

Mallory Falk / KERA News

Mexico is the second deadliest country in the world for transgender people, according to a recent study. Yet many LGBTQ migrants are stuck in the border city of Ciudad Juárez. 

Associated Press

In El Paso, a grand jury indicted the alleged gunman who killed 22 people at a local Walmart. The North Texas man is charged with capital murder.

Shutterstock

Plano Senior High School and El Paso's Eastwood High School face off in a highly-anticipated football game Thursday night — it comes a month after the mass shooting in El Paso.

Shutterstock

Dallas-Fort Worth TV station WFAA announced Tuesday it will broadcast next week’s high school football game featuring Plano Senior High and El Paso's Eastwood High School of El Paso.

This game almost didn’t happen.

Stella M Chávez, KERA News

On Aug. 3, 2019, a shooter at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, took the lives of 22, injured over two dozen and changed a whole community. The shooting was the worst targeting Latinx in modern U.S. history.

But as some survivors begin to process the horror, there might be a glimmer of hope: Those without a green card may now be eligible for a special visa, designed to protect crime victims. 

Attendees to Wednesday night's community memorial service in El Paso, at the Southwest University Park stadium stand for the national anthem.
Jonathan Levinson / OPB

Some survivors of the mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart may be eligible for a special visa designed to protect victims of crime.

Earlier this month, Margie Reckard, 63, was gunned down along with 21 others in the El Paso, Texas, massacre that authorities believe was driven by racial hatred. Two weeks later, strangers amassed by the hundreds to honor Reckard and surround her widower, Antonio Basco.

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