Voting Rights | KERA News

Voting Rights

Mississippi voters will be choosing a governor and other statewide offices in November under a unique set of election rules that date to the 19th century. A federal lawsuit by four African-American citizens is challenging the system as racially discriminatory.

Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson / The Texas Tribune

When Crystal Mason got out of federal prison, she said, she “got out running.”

By Nov. 8, 2016, when she’d been out for months but was still on supervised release, she was working full-time at Santander Bank in downtown Dallas and enrolled in night classes at Ogle Beauty School, trying, she said, to show her children that a “bump in the road doesn’t determine your future.”

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

Navigating the streets to the U.S. Supreme Court on a Sunday morning, veteran civil rights attorney Jose Garza was anxious.

It was the spring of 2018, and in two days the high court would consider whether Texas lawmakers had drawn political maps that purposefully undermined the voting strength of their state’s people of color.

How Texas Prevented Black Women From Voting Decades After The 19th Amendment

Jun 28, 2019
Michelle Lam/Houston Public Media

In 1918, when she was 25 years old, Christia Adair went door-to-door organizing for women’s right to vote in Texas.

"This effort was to pass a bill where women would be able to vote like men," Adair remembered later in a 1977 oral history interview with the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College.

"Well, we still didn't know that that didn't mean us. But we helped."