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Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

Experts have long predicted that a so-called “second wave” of the coronavirus could hit in the fall. That is especially concerning because, if that happens, it would coincide with the regular flu season.

From Texas Standard:

The traditional farm-to-table path for food has been disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. With so many people staying home and out of work, food supply chains can't operate as before. Demand for certain goods has also changed.

Ray Benson Tells His COVID-19 Recovery Story

May 1, 2020

From Texas Standard:

Most Texans have likely experienced some hardship because of the pandemic. But it's hit some harder than others, including those who've actually had COVID-19.

Ray Benson is a guitar player, singer and frontman for the band Asleep at the Wheel, and he has recovered from the disease. He told Texas Standard host David Brown on Thursday that it took a toll, but he's feeling better.

From Texas Standard:

For new parent Tracy Franklin Squires, her first take on motherhood echoed that of most moms, during this time of isolation because of the coronavirus pandemic.

“I have an infant at home,” Franklin Squires said. “So, I’m terrified.”

From Texas Standard:

As of Monday morning, there is no statewide shelter-in-place order in Texas like the ones in New York and California. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order last week requiring bars and gyms to close and restaurants to limit service to takeout orders. But he said expanding that to shelter in place would be up to local officials.

Abbott is also looking to grow the state's supply of safety equipment for medical professionals, to protect them from COVID-19.

From Texas Standard:

For decades, the booking mug shot has been a staple of crime reporting by news organizations. But since the arrival of the internet, news organizations have published galleries of photos belonging to people who have been arrested, even when they haven't been tried for their alleged crimes. Last week, the Houston Chronicle became the latest news organization to end the use of mug shot galleries.

From Texas Standard:

Almost 60 years since the founding of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, the group continues to elevate the voices of young African Americans pushing for civil rights.

Now, a photography exhibit at the Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin looks back at SNCC's early years. Maria Varela is one of the photographers featured in the exhibit, "This Light of Ours," and was the first Latina woman to document SNCC's activism in the Black Belt South.

From Texas Standard:

With six major flooding events and disaster declarations in each of the past five years, Houston is facing a new normal when it comes to risk from a changing environment. Now, the city is looking to create what Mayor Sylvester Turner calls a "resilient city" with a new, 186-page master plan.

From Texas Standard:

Navigating school isn't easy for many kids. Juggling classes, friends and extracurricular activities can be a challenge even in the best of circumstances. But it's especially hard for kids who are experiencing homelessness.

Texas Wool Mills Hang On To A Tradition

Feb 3, 2020

From Texas Standard:

In the 1950s and '60s, the idea that Texas would one day relinquish its position as the epicenter of the wool and mohair world must have felt unfathomable.

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services recently released new internal guidelines that cut the caseloads of foster care workers who have been overwhelmed for years by an unmanageable number of clients. But the department has faced many challenges lately, beyond a struggling workforce.

Why Texans Love H-E-B So Much

Jan 18, 2020

From Texas Standard:

Everything is bigger and better in Texas – at least that’s how the saying goes. From food to clothing, and now grocery stores, Texas consumers are proud of Texas brands, and H-E-B is one of them. The data also proves that popularity. H-E-B ranked No. 1 in a recent survey of consumer satisfaction with U.S. grocery stores by consumer data company dunnhumby. H-E-B even beat last year's No. 1, Trader Joe’s.

From Texas Standard:

In the boxing ring he was known as "Big George." But today, most people know George Foreman for his business ventures. Foreman has helped sell millions of George Foreman Grills, which were first introduced in 1994 and are still on the market today.

From Texas Standard:

It’s a clear, cool morning in West Texas, and about 50 people are watching a helicopter wind its way around the south side of Elephant Mountain – a brown, flat-topped summit about 30 miles south of Alpine. The sun isn’t all the way up yet, but you can tell that the helicopter is hauling some unusual cargo.

From Texas Standard:

Texas has changed a lot during the past decade. State Demographer Lloyd Potter says its population isn't just booming; it leads the country.

From Texas Standard:

On average, 1,000 people move to Texas each day. And traditionally, that means more roads and more lanes to accommodate new drivers. But when it comes to roads, is bigger always better?

From Texas Standard:

Tech giants Facebook and Google routinely work with third-party companies to monitor the content users put onto their platforms. Accenture is one of those outside contractors, and it operates Google’s largest so-called moderation site in Austin. There, workers spend hours watching and flagging YouTube videos. The problem is that these workers are constantly exposed to disturbing scenes of graphic violence and sexual crimes.

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From the Texas Standard:

Earlier this year, Fort Worth Councilwoman Kelly Allen Gray noticed something unusual in her district. A lot of dollar stores were opening their doors in a small area – over a hundred stores in a 15-mile radius. And some of her constituents didn’t like what they were seeing.

From Texas Sandard:

Sometime in the 1990s, concerns about rising crime rates in America's urban centers began to focus on Los Angeles. Some saw it as as ground zero for gangs. Stories about the Bloods and the Crips and other gangs often overlooked a more complicated history that preceded events on the West Coast by several decades. At the same time, they touched on many of the underlying issues, like poverty and social isolation.

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Department of Agriculture this week released a proposed set of rules for growing hemp, which had been illegal until the federal government's 2018 Farm Bill cleared the way for production.

The new rules will help would-be growers understand how the crop will be regulated. And when the hemp is ready to be harvested, a Dallas company has a plan for processing it.

NOTE: “Following the publication of the article previously on this page, it was subsequently reviewed by outside legal counsel. Fairness and accuracy are core to our guiding principles, and to that end, we have removed this story pending further review. We appreciate the work of the independent reporter and independent editor who worked on these stories in good faith. We will seek to provide more information on these matters in the coming days based on the outcome of ongoing reviews.”