seniors | KERA News

seniors

Hospitals and nursing homes in California and Illinois are testing a surprisingly simple strategy to stop the dangerous, antibiotic-resistant superbugs that kill thousands of people each year: washing patients with a special soap.

The efforts — funded with roughly $8 million from the federal government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — are taking place at 50 facilities in those two states.

fizkes / shutterstock

Many American families are staring down retirement with hardly any money set aside.

In fact, sociology professor and author Katherine S. Newman says about half of Americans have no savings at all. Many others haven't saved enough.

Primary care doctors are really good at checking seniors' cholesterol levels and blood pressure but often fail to use tests that could detect dementia.

Fewer than half of primary care doctors surveyed say they routinely test patients 65 and older for problems with memory and thinking, according to a report released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association.

Courtesy of The Village at Mapleshade

For the past week, KERA has been talking to early voters all across North Texas. Today, senior citizens — one of the most active voting blocs in the country.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Instead of having to go to the doctors for a checkup, how about getting a physical every day, without having to do anything at all? Starting this fall, a senior citizen will move in to a live-in laboratory in Fort Worth.

Older people are working more, voting more and drinking and smoking less than they used to. That's the good news.

But nearly three-quarters of older men and about two-thirds of women over age 64 are overweight or obese, making them more likely to have to deal with diabetes, arthritis and impaired mobility.

Shutterstock

Attention seniors, you will not lose Medicare coverage when the health insurance marketplace opens in October, nor will you have to go to the new online exchange to sign up for plans.

Sorry, wrong number

Shutterstock

Seniors in Texas are among the worst off in a new report ranking states by level of food security. While hunger is a problem usually associated with extreme poverty and children, the reality is we’ve got millions of seniors in the U.S. who are going hungry.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

If you’re nearing the age of 65, and hoping to live a long, healthy life, Minnesota, Idaho, and Washington are looking a lot better than Texas.