population | KERA News

population

Every year, more people move to Texas from other states than leave. They come for jobs, higher education and a relatively lower cost of living, among other things. But the net population growth from those new arrivals has been shrinking, and researchers are trying to figure out why.

Eddie Seal for The Texas Tribune

 

Justyna Furmanczyk

For many years, the prospect that Hispanics would become the state’s largest population group has been a question of “when” and not “if.”

Justyna Furmanczyk

The state’s population is still booming, and Hispanic Texans are driving a large portion of that growth. 

America's diversity remains on the rise, with all racial and ethnic minorities growing faster than whites from 2015 to 2016, the U.S. Census Bureau says in a new snapshot of the national population. The agency also found the U.S. median age has risen to nearly 38.

Asian and mixed-race people are the two fastest-growing segments of the U.S. population, the U.S. Census Bureau says. Both groups grew by 3 percent from July 2015 to July 2016. In the same 12 months, the non-Hispanic white population grew by just 5,000 people.