Politics | KERA News

Politics

Political news from North Texas, across the state and beyond.

Lawrence Jackson / The White House

UPDATE at 11:25 a.m. Wednesday: President Obama addressed the nation Tuesday night to discuss the Syrian crisis. The address comes as Syrian President Bashar Assad says he might be willing to give up his chemical weapons. PBS and NPR provided live coverage of the president's address. NPR developed this viewer's guide to the president's speech.  Obama sat down with PBS on Monday to discuss the situation. Assad spoke with PBS' Charlie Rose over the weekend. In case you missed the speech, scroll below for the video of the president's remarks. NPR published a live blog during Obama's address -- here's a recap.

In the war over the right to vote in the U.S., the Justice Department's choice of Texas as the battleground for its first legal action following the Supreme Court's weakening of the Voting Rights Act has a feeling of inevitability.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

State Representative Dan Branch officially launched his campaign for Texas Attorney General Tuesday.

The conservative Dallasite says constitutional liberties are under siege in Washington and he vows to fight for them.

Office of Sen. Wendy Davis

With Republicans Greg Abbott and Tom Pauken already campaigning for governor, Texans want to know whether Sen. Wendy Davis of Fort Worth will challenge them from the Democratic side.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Attorney General Greg Abbott made his first stop in North Texas Tuesday in his two day old campaign for governor.

He spent the afternoon in Duncanville, the city where he grew up; and he was received like a hometown hero.

Texas Tribune

It appears State Sen. Wendy Davis’s filibuster did more than temporarily derail the abortion bill.

It also sparked a fundraising frenzy that netted her $933,000 in the final two weeks of June.

That means Davis, a Fort Worth Democrat, has more than one million dollars in the bank as she considers whether to run for governor.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott meanwhile collected  $4.78 million during the final two weeks of June and has more than $20 million available for his campaign.

Here’s the breakdown in donations provided by Davis’ office:

Attorney General Greg Abbott touted his prosecution of child predators and his legal challenges to "overreaching" Washington policies as he announced his candidacy for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in San Antonio. In the coming week he'll visit 10 cities in five days, including Duncanville on Tuesday. Abbott attended high school there.

The Texas Senate spent another late night debating some of the toughest abortion restrictions in the nation. But this time, things turned out as expected.

Senators voted 19-11 to send the bill to Gov. Rick Perry for a signature. The Texas Tribune reports that thousands of protesters outside the Capitol erupted after the decision. But inside the chamber there was none of the raucous yelling and chanting that ran the clock out on the bill two and a half weeks ago.

Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Update, Saturday 11 a.m.: Pro-abortion-rights protesters say they don't believe the DPS statement about feces and urine, and the Texas Tribune couldn't find a single DPS officer who reported confiscating bodily fluids.

A spokesman says Attorney General Greg Abbott will make "an important announcement" Sunday near San Antonio's famed Riverwalk. It is widely expected Abbott will announce his candidacy for the Republican gubernatorial nomination.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

The “Stand With Texas Women” bus tour parked in the middle of a sea of orange in Fort Worth Wednesday night.

Senator Wendy Davis along with other North Texas Democrats and hundreds of pro-choice activists gathered to rally for women’s rights.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Republicans in the Texas House have passed the bill that bans most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.  It’s now headed to the Senate, where it is also expected to pass.

Knowing they don’t have enough votes to stop the bill, pro-choice Democrats are taking their fight to the streets. Their “Stand With Texas Women” road trip”  stopped in Dallas Wednesday morning.

Veronica Zaragovia / KUT News

The Texas House of Representatives has approved new abortion limits less than two weeks after Senate Republicans failed to finish work on the bill amid a filibuster and raucous protests.

Shelley Kofler, KERA

Final approval from the Texas House could come as early as today for a ban on most abortions beyond 20-weeks of pregnancy. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT News

The steps of the state Capitol were awash in orange and blue Monday night as the Texas House prepares for the abortion bill to come to the floor Tuesday.

After pro-choice activists packed the Capitol and helped kill abortion restrictions two weeks ago, the right-to-life crowd is leaving nothing to chance.

The Texas House of Representatives takes up a bill today that would give the state some of the toughest abortion restrictions in the country. The gallery is packed, and the House is in session. Watch here (courtesy of our friends at the Texas Tribune.)

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Attorney General Greg Abbott is saying little about his plans to run for governor- even though he became the perceived front-runner in next year’s campaign when Gov. Rick Perry said Monday he won’t seek a fourth term. 

Hundreds of people filed paperwork to testify on SB 1, so while public comment began Monday before noon, it didn't wrap until early Tuesday morning.

Matt Stiles / NPR

NPR and KERA spent Independence Week drilling deep into the Lone Star state, and the demographic revolution that's reshaping it, with the series Texas 2020.

But a story this big can't be contained to just one week, as data editor Matt Stiles proves today with an insightful blog post, Texas' Looming Hispanic Shift Explained, In Two Charts.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas Republicans are holding their collective breath. Gov. Rick Perry is expected to announce whether or not he'll seek a fourth consecutive term at 1 p.m.

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country. We take a closer look at the local journalists covering the coming changes, in this part of the series.

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Democrats see opportunity in Texas' fast-growing Latino population. But the Republican Party is strong in Texas — very strong.

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Few know Texas' population as well as its official demographer, Lloyd Potter, a professor at the University of Texas, San Antonio. He talked with NPR this week about his research.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Texas Legislature Online streaming / Texas Tribune

Nearly 2,000 people have signed up to speak for or against House Bill 2 -- which would add new abortion restrictions in Texas.

The first witness did not get the microphone until more than an hour of Tuesday's committee meeting had passed. Panel members spoke first to question the bill's author, Parker's Jodie Laubenberg, a North Texas Republican.

The governor plans an announcement for San Antonio. Here's how the Texas Tribune breaks it down: "It's looking increasingly unlikely that Perry will seek a fourth term ... his gubernatorial campaign team has largely been disassembled and his fundraising pales in comparison to that of his likely successor, Attorney General Greg Abbott."

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

For most of the 20th century, Texas was a stronghold for Democrats. But Republicans have dominated the state for decades now.

As part of NPR's weeklong series "Texas 2020," data editor Matt Stiles (himself a former Texan) dives into the number and comes up with a fascinating map-by-map look at the political divide between the state's cities and country.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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All week, we are looking at demographic changes in the currently very red, very Republican Lone Star state. Democrats hope the growing size and potential voting clout of the Latin population will turn Texas blue.

LeAnn Wallace / YNN

Less than a week after protesters and Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, ran the clock out on a tough new abortion bill, they were back Monday -- this time clad in orange.

But their opponents, too, returned for the start of the second legislative special session. And with an iron grip on the Capitol, Republicans vowed not to allow the bill to fail this time around.

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