Pete Sessions | KERA News

Pete Sessions

Former U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions
Angela Piazza for The Texas Tribune

As Pete Sessions seeks a return to Congress, he has spent over $80,000 in campaign funds on legal fees, illuminating a wrinkle in campaign finance law while drawing increasing criticism from his Republican primary runoff opponent.

Associated Press

Former Republican Rep. Pete Sessions' climb back into Congress was already off to a rough start, with some in his own party suggesting he was carpetbagging by leaving the Dallas district he lost last fall to try to get elected in a far more rural and politically safe one.

Dana Verkouteren via AP

Businessmen with ties to Rudy Giuliani lobbied a U.S. congressman in 2018 for help ousting the American ambassador to Ukraine around the same time they committed to raising money for the lawmaker.

An indictment unsealed Thursday identified the lawmaker only as "Congressman 1." But the donations described in the indictment match campaign finance reports for former Rep. Pete Sessions, a Texas Republican who lost his re-election bid in November 2018.

Angela Piazza / The Texas Tribune

Former U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions is an unnamed member of Congress mentioned in an indictment against two business associates of President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudolph Giuliani, according to NBC News.

Cooper Neill / The Texas Tribune

Former U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions formally launched his campaign Thursday to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Bill Flores, R-Bryan, opting against running again in his old Dallas-based district and pressing forward in Flores' 17th District despite some local Republican unease.

Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson / The Texas Tribune

Former Republican U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions appears poised to make a comeback attempt — but not in his old Dallas-based district.

Andy Jacobsohn / AP

Democrats are now in control of the House of Representatives — and North Texas Democrat Colin Allred will be joining them to form the new majority.

Sessions: J. Scott Applewhite, AP; Allred: Chris Connelly, KERA News

In North Texas’ most heated congressional race, health care has become the dominant issue. Longtime Republican Rep. Pete Sessions is facing his toughest political challenge in years from Democrat and civil rights lawyer Colin Allred for his North Dallas seat. And the two candidates and their supporters are spending millions of dollars on ads to paint the other guy as a bad choice.

So where do the two stand?

Anthony Cave / KERA News

U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions and his Democratic challenger, Colin Allred, traded jabs Sunday night at a debate moderated by KERA's Sam Baker at Temple Shalom in Dallas.

Vice President Mike Pence, right, stumped for Rep. Pete Sessions, left, in Dallas on October 8, 2018.
Christopher Connelly / KERA News

The race for Texas’ 32nd Congressional district is drawing a lot of national attention, and a lot of money. 

Vice President stumped for U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions on Monday at Park Cities Hilton in Dallas. Sessions is in a battle for Congressional District 32 with Democrat Colin Allred, a civil rights attorney and former NFL linebacker.
Christopher Connelly/KERA

Vice President Mike Pence came to Dallas on Monday to campaign for a pair of Republican incumbents, U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions and U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Both are facing tough Democratic challengers.

Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson for The Texas Tribune

Vice President Mike Pence is visiting Dallas on Monday to campaign for U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions, according to a White House official.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

North Texas congressman Pete Sessions is drawing criticism for recent remarks about a domestic violence incident, in which he seems to imply a woman was killed by her husband because she won an “unfair” divorce settlement.

A Sessions spokeswoman says the longtime North Dallas congressman misspoke, but his Democratic challenger pounced, accusing Sessions of excusing domestic violence.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

“If you’re disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures and run for office yourself.”

That’s what Barack Obama told his forlorn supporters in his farewell address last year as he prepared to leave office. One group that seems to have taken that message to heart are the people who worked in his administration.

Local television newsman Brett Shipp has left his position at Dallas-based WFAA to run for Congress, according to a news report from the station.

Linah Mohammad/KERA News

The Republican leadership in Congress will spend next week hammering out details in their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare. Some of that will happen in the committee chaired by Pete Sessions.

Texans Eye Leadership Posts After Boehner Retires

Sep 25, 2015
Texas Tribune

WASHINGTON — U.S. House Speaker John A. Boehner’s retirement could create an opportunity for at least two Texans to emerge as national party leaders.

Shelley Kofler / KERA

Across Texas, several incumbent Republicans are facing aggressive challengers in this year’s primary, and Ted Cruz is part of the reason why. 

His upset of David Dewhurst, the longtime lieutenant governor, in the 2012 U.S. Senate race has encouraged other tea party candidates to run for the first time. 

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

“Who are the navigators?” That’s the title of a House Oversight Committee hearing in Dallas Monday looking at the people who help Texans sign up for health insurance through the federal exchange.