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Parkland shooting

One Year Later: After March For Our Lives

Mar 27, 2019
Students across the country, including University of Texas at Arlington student Nyasha Magocha, center, helped plan the first March for our Lives in 2018.
Guns & America

In the year since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, young people have brought gun issues to the forefront of our national consciousness like never before.

Within one week, there have been two suicides of Parkland, Fla., school shooting survivors.  

Laura Isensee / Houston Public Media

Sandy Hook. Parkland. Santa Fe.

If it seems like school shootings are becoming more common, there is some data to support that.

From Texas Standard:

A year ago Thursday, a shooter killed 17 students and staff members at a high school in Parkland, Fla. Three months later, it happened again: A gunman killed eight students and two teachers at Santa Fe High School, south of Houston.

In Texas, there's been skepticism over the years about the intentions of those who call for gun control. But one year after Parkland, and almost nine months after Santa Fe, there are small signs of a shift.

There will be no marching.

There will be no school walkouts.

Only a day of reflection and service and, perhaps most consequential, a time to grieve.

That is how many of the Parkland, Fla., survivors turned activists plan to spend Thursday, the first anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Carmen Schentrup was one week away from celebrating her 17th birthday when she was killed in last year's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

A talented musician and driven student, Carmen had dreams of becoming a medical researcher and finding a cure for the neurodegenerative disease ALS.

Now, her parents, Philip and April, wear teal bracelets printed with her name and the dates that mark her short life: 2/21/2001-2/14/2018.

About a 10-minute drive from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, on an empty lot across from city hall in Coral Springs, Fla., a temple has been slowly taking shape. Sheets of beech plywood have been milled into intricate, lacelike designs. They will form the walls and ceiling of a nearly 40-foot-tall structure that artist David Best calls the Temple of Time.

A longtime Trump ally pushed to have two fathers of Parkland victims tossed out of a congressional hearing on gun violence — a reflection of the vociferous nature of the debate Democrats have made a priority in the new Congress.

Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., sparked commotion in the hearing when he listed circumstances in which violence was committed by undocumented immigrants, and said the solution would be to build the Trump-backed wall along the Southwest border.

The first cases related to the Parkland school shooting in February are beginning to work through the courts, testing a number of thorny legal issues.

In the last week, for example, judges in different courts ruled on questions about what duty school deputy Scot Peterson had to protect the students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the attack there in February.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As the nation's eyes were on Broward County, Florida, for a flawed, week long election recount, a state commission a few miles away was investigating the county government's role in the Feb. 14 massacre at a Parkland high school. It found that failed leadership, inconsistent or unenforced policies, and misinformation contributed to the 17 deaths.

David J. Phillip / AP

Police officers have long had a presence in public schools. But since the deadly school shootings in Santa Fe and Parkland, Florida, more Texas school children have found themselves facing police for actions the authors of a new study view as kids just being kids.

Michael Mond/Shutterstock.com

Governor Greg Abbott's recommendations for increased school safety stems from the May 18 deadly shootings at Santa Fe High School near Houston. The tragedy and the debate over guns has had Dallas resident Aasim Saeed thinking back on his time at the school. 

The former school resource officer who remained outside during the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. — and resigned earlier this year amid intense public scorn — is receiving a monthly pension of $8,702.35.

The Florida Department of Management Services says Scot Peterson began receiving the payments last month, which do not include health insurance benefits.

Newly released footage captured by Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School security cameras show a Broward sheriff's deputy go toward a building at the time a gunman was shooting inside, but the officer stayed outside with his handgun drawn.

The video, released Thursday by the Broward Sheriff's office, sheds more light on the actions of former deputy Scot Peterson, during the Feb. 14 rampage in Parkland, Fla., that left 17 students and school staff dead, and another 17 people injured.