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Native Americans

Dallas City Council Recognizes Indigenous Peoples' Day

Oct 9, 2019
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The Dallas City Council voted to recognize the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Supporters like Dallas council member Omar Narvaez say the resolution helps create healing and reconciliation and provide an accurate representation of state and local history.

Charles Gourd's garden is so big that before he installed irrigation, it could take three hours to water everything by hand. He grows beans and cucumbers that wind up archways you can walk underneath and pluck the ripe vegetables as though they're growing in thin air.

It's been 20 years since Carolyn DeFord, a member of the Puyallup tribe, last saw her mother, Leona Kinsey in La Grande, Ore.

DeFord was raised by Kinsey in a trailer park in La Grande. She remembers her mother as independent and self-sufficient, working odd jobs to scrape by.

Six months ago, I found myself preparing for battle.

I was lying in bed at 5:30 a.m., going over in my head how to handle the next encounter with my 3-year-old daughter, Rosy.

Goodness knows, I love her so much. But there's a fire in that little belly. And to be honest, I have no idea how to handle all the anger — the tantrums, the screaming and, most of all, the hitting.

When she's angry and I pick her up, she has a habit of slapping me across the face. Sometimes it really hurts. I've even started ducking like a boxer when I lift her up.

A DNA test showing that Sen. Elizabeth Warren has Native American ancestry is "completely irrelevant to the process" of determining her tribal identity, the Cherokee secretary of state told NPR's Morning Edition.

Chuck Hoskin was also critical of President Trump, saying he "should not be calling her 'Pocahontas,' " and that he "should be looking into what the needs of Indian Country are, because the needs are there."

Study co-author Maria Nieves Zedeño / School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona

Long before European explorers arrived in the New World, Native American communities used fire to keep warm and to manage the land.

Christopher Roos is an archaeologist at Southern Methodist University and lead author of a new study that looks into how that use of fire affected the ecosystem.

Texas State Archives

Texas was a very different place two centuries ago. It was home to roaming tribes and just a few permanent settlements. Researcher Sam Haynes of UT Arlington says it was the most diverse place in North America.

Brittney Tatchell / Smithsonian Institution

Nearly two decades after an ancient skeleton was discovered in Kennewick, Washington, scientists finally have a better idea about its hotly-debated origins. SMU anthropologist David Meltzer co-authored a recent study into what’s been dubbed the Kennewick Man. 

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

There aren't many Navajo Code Talkers still living -- maybe 20 out of the more than 400 who served in the U.S. military during World War II. On Friday, two men from the Navajo Nation in Arizona visited the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in Fort Worth.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Obamacare could make getting access to healthcare a lot easier for the Riley’s. In the North Texas family of five, three are members of the Choctaw Nation and have special perks under the Affordable Care Act. As part of KERA’s series Obamacare 101: Making The Choice, we bring you a profile the Riley’s.