entrepreneurs | KERA News

entrepreneurs

Anita McHaney displays a photo of her beets and carrots. She and her husband stopped farming after learning that they could not sell pickled beets.
Laura Skelding for The Texas Tribune

In a victory for home cooks across Texas, the Legislature has expanded the state’s definition of the word “pickle,” allowing for pickled beets, carrots and other produce to be easily sold at farmers’ markets alongside pickled cucumbers.

Armando Farias, 56, tends to his small shop filled with Mexican goods at Plaza Garland.
Miguel Perez / KERA News

Plaza Garland is an indoor marketplace where mariachi bands play regularly and merchants sell everything from Mexican ice cream and custom-made piñatas to gold jewelry and handmade toys.

It's nothing like the old Kmart that used to stand in its place.

Lemonade stands aren't legal in Texas, but House lawmakers gave a preliminary OK today to a bill that would undo that legislative oversight that's dragged on for 85 legislative sessions.

Kim Roxie was a student when she first realized there was a problem.

“It was working at a makeup counter while I was in college and coming in contact with so many women who were tired of the way beauty was being done,” she says. “A lot of beige and not enough brown in the cosmetic department.”

By definition, whiskey is a grain spirit. And until now, that "grain" has been limited by federal law to four specific crops: corn, wheat, rye and barley.

So when Darek Bell, founder of Corsair Distillery in Nashville, Tenn., wanted to start experimenting with alternatives, there wasn't really a playbook to follow.

Krystina Martinez

When folks talk about tech accelerators and entrepreneurship, the images that usually spring to mind are of sparkling Silicon Valley campuses or hip downtown live/work lofts.

Michelle Williams is dedicated to bringing that spirit to southern Dallas. She's leading a branch of the Dallas Entrepreneur Center opening soon as part of the re-imagined Red Bird Mall.

Courtesy of Jon McNight

Drive along Interstate 35W in Fort Worth and you'll see a painted sign on a three-story brick building: O.B. Macaroni. 

For more than a century, the building was home to a family-owned maker of macaroni and other starchy products. Now, this old landmark is getting new life: Entrepreneurs are moving in and finding space to make their own goods and expand their brands.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

High schools have been teaching business courses for years. But a curriculum new to North Texas is bringing a hands-on approach to eight schools this year.  In our continuing American Graduate Initiative, we visit a class in Fort Worth’s Trimble Tech High School.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Incubators and accelerators are popping up across the country to help startups bloom. And in the year since the Dallas Entrepreneur Center put down roots, the nonprofit has moved into new downtown space and teamed up on an incubator in Addison.

Trey Bowles is CEO of the operation known as The DEC, and he joins KERA’s vice president of news, Rick Holter, for this week’s Friday Conversation.

Shutterstock

There’s about to be a new home for doctor entrepreneurs in Dallas-Fort Worth.  April 24th marks the launch of the new chapter of the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs (SoPE).

Brittany Lynk / North Texas International Visitors Center

A group of female entrepreneurs from two dozen countries across the world visited Dallas this week. As part of the Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership program, the women got a chance to meet with North Texas entrepreneurs.

Shutterstock

The 73-year-old Masonic Temple in Downtown Dallas will soon be getting a major makeover. The building’s new owners, Stephanie and Hunter Hunt, will turn the 43,000 square foot building into a hub of creativity.

Janelle O'Haugherty / Fidelity Investments

A few weeks back, we brought you the story of teenage entrepreneurs spending a chunk of their summers making their pitch at BizCamp in Irving’s MacArthur High School.  Now, the results are in, and top honors went to two of the kids we spotlighted -- the sister-brother team of Alisha and Danyial Hamid.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Some Irving high school students are sweating through summer school, but not because they need better grades. They’re in entrepreneur camp, and at the end of the week, campers will compete for cash prizes that could help launch a business