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Associated Press

Amazon is going on a hiring spree.

The online shopping giant is holding job fairs across the country next week, aiming to hire more than 30,000 people by early next year, a 5% bump in its total workforce.

MAAEC

Ethiopian New Year is next week, and the Ethiopian community in North Texas will start celebrating this weekend at a festival in Garland.

Thousands are expected to attend the annual Ethiopian Cultural Festival, also called Ethiopia Day. It’s organized by the Mutual Assistance Association for Ethiopian Community (MAAEC)

Associated Press

The past glories and present struggles at American Airlines were on display across the country Wednesday.

American flew its last two dozen MD-80 planes into retirement in the New Mexico desert. Some still bore the sleek, polished aluminum livery created in 1967 by Italian designer Massimo Vignelli.

Texas A&M Transportation Institute

If you think you waste a lot of time stuck in traffic, you're right. A new report says drivers in Dallas-Fort Worth lose nearly three days every year stuck in traffic.

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Authorities say Glen Richter was arrested and booked early Thursday into the Dallas County jail in the death of 22-year-old Sara Hudson, who worked in Dallas after graduating recently from the University of Arkansas.

From Texas Standard:

Earlier this summer, law enforcement leaders in Dallas said homicide rates were the highest the city has seen in a decade. They’re expecting 228 by the end of the year. In one of case, police charged a man with killing 9-year-old Brandoniya Bennett who was shot in the head while sitting in her home on Aug. 14, reports The Dallas Morning News.

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Uber will receive a $24 million incentive package from Texas officials and open a new administrative hub in Dallas, bringing with it about 3,000 jobs, Gov. Greg Abbott announced Tuesday.

Associated Press

A Dallas-based company is facing criticism for naming a beer after the location of nuclear tests that resulted in the contamination of a Pacific island chain, a report said.

Manhattan Project Beer Company is under scrutiny by Marshall Islanders who were exposed to high levels of radiation by U.S. government research from 1946 to 1958, The Pacific Daily News reported Thursday.

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Dallas police say their suspect in the shooting mistake that killed a 9-year-old girl has turned himself in to authorities.

Dallas' Spike In Homicides Has Officials Perplexed. Are State Troopers Helping?

Aug 15, 2019
Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson / The Texas Tribune

As Joseph Pintucci's 18th birthday approached, his aunt and legal guardian Andrea Haag spent dinners listening to the Highland Park High School graduate rattle through the list of cars for sale he’d flagged throughout the day. His maternal uncle Ben Harrington would chime in on whether each one was worth the money.

Nearly 1 in 3 Dallas children grow up in poverty — and more than 100,000 kids in the city are living below the poverty line. A North Texas nonprofit has a plan for a collaborative response and an ambitious goal: to cut childhood poverty in half within 20 years. 

Associated Press

As funerals were held Thursday in Mexico for some of the country's citizens who died in the El Paso shooting, a lawyer for the suspected gunman's family said they never heard him express racist views.

Image via U.S House of Representatives

U.S. Rep. Kenny Marchant will not seek reelection in 2020, two sources confirmed to The Texas Tribune late Sunday.

He is the fourth member of the Texas delegation to announce his retirement in recent days. Marchant's decision was first reported by The New York Times.

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Police body camera video footage shows a man who called 911 to request help crying, pleading then going limp as arresting officers restrain him. Soon after, a paramedic says he's dead.

Stella Chávez / KERA News

New data shows that while homelessness is going down in Houston, it's going up in Dallas. The Point-In-Time Count is an annual census done at the end of each January across the country, and Juan Pablo Garnham wrote about this for the Texas Tribune. He spoke with KERA's Justin Martin.

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An Austin-based conservative think tank has sued to block a Dallas ordinance requiring businesses to offer their employees paid sick leave.

Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson / The Texas Tribune

The Republican primary to challenge U.S. Rep. Colin Allred, D-Dallas, is finally starting to take shape.

One candidate, former Navy SEAL Floyd McLendon, entered the race Monday. And more announcements are expected before the end of the summer as the opposition begins to crystallize for what will be an uphill battle. Allred easily flipped the 32nd District last year as he unseated U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Dallas.

UNT Health Science Center

The UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth is pioneering a new way to combat back pain. It's called the Precision Pain Research Registry. Dr. John Licciardone is spearheading the project for the center — it aims to analyze the DNA of volunteers across Texas to come up with a better way to treat pain. 

Mariusz S. Jurgielewicz / Shutterstock

Days before Dallas' paid sick leave policy takes effect, a conservative organization said it will sue the city if it doesn't delay implementation. 

Dallas Police Department

Dallas police officials have confirmed that police Chief U. Renee Hall is on medical leave following surgery earlier this week.

Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson / The Texas Tribune

During this year’s legislative session, Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price was among scores of city leaders who actively opposed yet another series of attempts by state officials to limit how much money local governments collect. But with lawmakers determined to reform the local property tax process, she and other mayors had little luck fighting off what many city officials considered attacks on local control.

A wrong-way car crash that killed former Dallas City Council member Carolyn Davis has also claimed the life of Davis' daughter, 26-year-old Melissa Davis Nunn. Nunn died from injuries Tuesday.

Associated Press

Billionaire and philanthropist H. Ross Perot was remembered Tuesday in two private services. Perot, who died last week at age 89, was hailed as a fiercely competitive man of faith and patriotism who, above all else, put his family first.

Ashley Landis / Dallas Morning News via Associated Press

On the afternoon of August 18, 1994, Eddie Bernice Johnson, a barrier-breaking freshman congresswoman from Dallas, stood on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives and stumped for the most infamous legislation of that decade.

Six years ago, a newly minted graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago was working three part-time jobs and adjusting to life not as a student. She stopped in for a drink one night at a restaurant in Chicago's Bucktown neighborhood, where she got into a conversation with a guy. The next thing she remembers clearly was awakening at home the next morning, aching, covered in bruises, with a swollen lip.

Associated Press

H. Ross Perot died Tuesday morning at age 89, of leukemia. He was born in Texarkana and became a bigger than life entrepreneur and Texas billionaire. Perot ran twice for president – first as an independent and then as a third party candidate.

AP photo

A billionaire businessman rises from celebrity to the presidential stage, shaking up the establishment and raising nostalgic hopes about making America great again. Nearly three decades ago, that described Ross Perot, the plain-talking Texan who died Tuesday at age 89, leaving a lasting political legacy.

Stella Chávez / KERA News

After a solemn ceremony, Dallas city and police officials unveiled a sculpture honoring five police officers killed in a sniper attack in downtown Dallas three years ago.

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Dallas police officials say more than two-dozen officers face disciplinary measures after they were found to have posted bigoted or other offensive material to social media in violation of the department's code of conduct, including mocking protesters who were pepper-sprayed.

Pixabay

Daryl Howard turns 65 in October. He has a Glock .45-caliber handgun stored in his desk at home, but hopes never to use it.

"It's not something that's taken lightly," Howard says on a weekday afternoon, in his second-floor Dallas apartment. 

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