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cattle

Tarleton.edu

Millions of people track their activities through wearable devices like the Apple Watch or Fitbit. Now a team at Tarleton State University in Stephenville is monitoring cattle using the same technology. 

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Denton Bible Church has some unusual outreach programs. The "Sweat Team" is a group of folks who help clean up storm debris. And then there's the "Cattle Ministry," a church-run herd that provides beef to low income families in Denton. 

From Texas Standard:

Raising cattle anywhere is hard, but it’s especially hard in the Rio Grande Valley. And that’s thanks to fever ticks. They can spread a fatal disease that decimated cattle herds through the 1900s and is still feared today. And it’s not just the ticks themselves that can cause headaches, but the regulations designed to control them.

Cattle Theft Still A Modern-Day Problem In Texas

Oct 29, 2015
Callie Richmond / Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune: When Larry Gray's rangers send out an all-points bulletin, they generally don't know much about the height and weight of the suspects they're after. But they can describe what was stolen, detailing cattle brands on heifers and estimated weights of steers.

WaggonerRanch.com

A couple hours northwest of Fort Worth, the Waggoner Ranch is up for sale. The legendary, half-million-acre ranch near Wichita Falls has a history almost as big as its $725 million price tag. KERA’s Justin Martin talks with Eric O’Keefe of the Land Report about the ranch’s outsized legacy. 

The drought finally broke for Texas ranchers late last year. The range and pasturelands on which cattle graze began to recover. Then came the spring. In Cameron, about 140 miles northwest of Houston, the rain began falling at the start of May — and didn't stop all month.

Texas has long been cattle country. But there's greater worldwide demand for goat meat. And drought is threatening to put cattle ranchers out of business. So, Texas Monthly asks, should Texas become goat country?