cardiac arrest | KERA News

cardiac arrest

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African Americans are twice as likely to suffer from sudden cardiac death compared to whites — that rate is triple for black women. A new study published in the Dallas-based American Heart Association’s journal 'Circulation' shows that risk might be tied to income and education disparities.

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When a patient’s heart stops, responding quickly is a matter of life or death. A new study out of UT Southwestern shows some hospitals respond faster than others — with a life-saving medication.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

In television dramas, CPR is often successful. The nurse or doctor is able to resuscitate lifeless body within minutes, simply by pushing on their chest. Unfortunately, in the real world, less than 20 percent of people who receive CPR in a hospital actually survive.

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Study results being released today in 'Circulation' magazine confirm what KERA reported two years ago- that repeated chest compressions have dramatically improved the survival rate for cardiac arrest patients.