All Elections | KERA News

All Elections

The results of the biggest voting day in the presidential contest thus far may not have been everything that front-runners Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton had hoped, but they were enough to set the course for the remainder of the nominating season.

And they were surely enough to intensify the pressure on their respective rivals.

Super Tuesday was a big night for both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. They each captured seven states in their respective Democratic and Republican races, extending leads over their remaining rivals.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Ted Cruz and Hillary Clinton both won the presidential primaries in Texas. In North Texas, several incumbent Congress members easily won their primaries. Votes in local races were slow to come in Tuesday evening.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump notched big wins across the South on Super Tuesday as they extended their leads for their party's nomination.

On the Republican side, Trump has won seven states: Virginia, Arkansas, Alabama, Tennessee, Vermont, Massachusetts and Georgia. Sen. Ted Cruz won his home state of Texas, eked out a surprise victory in Oklahoma and won the caucuses in Alaska. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio finally got his first outright win by taking the Minnesota caucuses.

Reuters

Public radio stations across Texas are joining forces tonight to provide statewide primary coverage. 

After Super Tuesday, Some Need To Consider Dropping Out, Ted Cruz Says

Mar 1, 2016
Patrick Svitek / Texas Tribune

Hours before polls closed in Super Tuesday states, Ted Cruz began making the argument that the results of the day's nominating contests should cause some of his presidential rivals to consider dropping out of the race. 

By now you've probably heard what Super Tuesday means in terms of the delegate count for the presidential nominating contests. There are almost 2,000 delegates up for grabs across 12 states for the two parties today. But how are those special votes divided up in a primary or caucus?


The big day is finally here — after tonight's Super Tuesday results, there will be a much clearer picture of how both the Republican and Democratic races could shake out. Will Donald Trump continue his dominance? Can Marco Rubio catch up? Can Ted Cruz rebound? Will Hillary Clinton roll through the South? Can Bernie Sanders bounce back after a devastating South Carolina loss?

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Texas used to be considered an easy grab for U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz. And while the state’s delegates are definitely not out of reach on Tuesday, there are some primary voters slipping through his fingers. 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

On Tuesday, voters will cast ballots in Texas’ Democratic primary. The most recent polls show Hillary Clinton with a significant lead over opponent Bernie Sanders. That hasn’t stopped both groups from knocking on doors in North Texas and bringing out their party’s big brass to get voters to the polls.

More than a dozen states vote Tuesday, and almost 1,500 delegates are at stake. It's the biggest day of the 2016 presidential election, and it could be pivotal.

Seven Southern states are voting Tuesday — Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. That means on the Democratic side, black voters will play a pivotal role. (Six of those states, except Oklahoma, have significant black populations in Democratic primaries.) But for the GOP, those same Southern states mean a more socially conservative, more religious electorate.

Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders' message of modern-day populism brought out Texans by the thousands on Saturday.

Laura Buckman / Texas Tribune

Ben Carson’s campaign may be flagging, but he can still attract a Texas crowd. 

Hillary Clinton won the South Carolina Democratic primary on Saturday, notching a decisive win in a state where she suffered a devastating loss just eight years ago.

The Associated Press called the race for the former secretary of state over rival Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders just seconds after the polls closed at 7 p.m. ET. With all precincts reporting, Clinton beat Sanders by nearly 50 points, winning 73.5 percent to 26 percent.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Real estate magnate Donald Trump chose Cowtown as his site to announce perhaps the most high-profile endorsement of his campaign, the support of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. 

Texas House of Representatives

When it comes to just about every state legislative race in Texas, the March 1 primary is effectively the election. There are deep red Republican districts and deep blue battles in Democratic districts. There are just a handful of purple districts with competitive general election races come fall.

It's big.

The five remaining candidates for the Republican presidential nomination meet tonight in Houston, Texas, the biggest city in the biggest state holding a primary on March 1, which is Super Tuesday, which is the biggest voting day so far in 2016 – and the biggest all year besides election day in November.

Whoever prevails tonight gets a long leg up toward being the biggest vote-getter on Tuesday. And whoever sits on top after Tuesday is going to be increasingly hard to deny.

Dwaine Caraway campaign/Twitter

The fallout continues from Monday’s meltdown between two Dallas County commissioner candidates.

TCU Catholics Respond To Pope's Immigration Comments

Feb 23, 2016
Action Sports Photography / Shutterstock.com

After the pope's criticism of Donald Trump's immigration policies last week, a priest at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth said Francis has taught the message of building bridges — not walls — all along.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Bill Clinton made a historic trip to Paul Quinn College Monday. It was the first time a president – former or current – has visited the private, historically black university in Dallas.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

Tarrant County Sheriff Dee Anderson is seeking his fifth and, he says, final term. 

Shutterstock

As Texans start heading to the polls for early voting Tuesday, they’ll get to name their choice for their party’s presidential nominee. Some of them will also be choosing sides in fierce battles over seats in the state legislature, races where millions of dollars are being spent to convince Republicans in North Texas how to vote.

Burlingham/Shutterstock

Millennials are the largest generation in the United States today and politicians want their vote. But we don’t know a lot about their voting habits. Alexander Heffner has studied millennials. He’s host of PBS’s "The Open Mind."

Jeb Bush has struggled in the fight for the Republican nomination and now he's asking his big brother — George W. Bush, the 43rd president of the United States — for help.

The two will be together for a rally Monday evening in North Charleston, S.C.

PBS

We livestreamed the PBS NewsHour Democratic Primary Debate with Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won clear, early and decisive victories in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Trump beat the GOP field by double digits. He got 35 percent of the vote, well ahead of surprise second-place finisher John Kasich, who pulled in 16 percent. Kasich was followed by Ted Cruz at 12 percent, Jeb Bush at 11 percent and Marco Rubio, who, after a poor debate performance Saturday, faded to fifth just shy of 11 percent.

Texas Takes On Growing Role In 2016 Democratic Primary

Feb 9, 2016
Amanda Renteria / Texas Tribune

SAN ANTONIO — On Saturday, as Hillary Clinton knocked on doors in New Hampshire days before the state’s primary, Amanda Renteria, her national political director, was doing the same 2,000 miles away.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

The Denton County Republican Party held its biggest fundraiser of the year on Ronald Reagan’s birthday and it was a show of force. About 1,000 Republicans in formal wear crowded into a cavernous banquet hall Saturday to hear from elected leaders.

As any bridge player can tell you, the game is different when there is no trump.

On Thursday night in Des Moines, Iowa, the seventh debate among major candidates for president in the Republican Party set a new standard in both substance and tone. And it did so because the front-runner in the 2016 nomination fight, Donald J. Trump, did not attend.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

In 2012, Ted Cruz made history when he beat incumbent Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst for a seat in the U.S. Senate. In his first campaign, he pulled together a large dose of Tea Party anger and a little bit of evangelical power. As his presidential campaign focuses on Monday’s Iowa caucuses, he’s added a few new emotional ingredients to the mix.

Pages