COVID-19 Live Updates: 1 Additional Death, 228 New Cases In Dallas County | KERA News

COVID-19 Live Updates: 1 Additional Death, 228 New Cases In Dallas County

16 hours ago

Get live updates throughout the day on how COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus, is affecting North Texas. 

» COVID-19 By The Numbers:

Sunday, May 31

One Additional Death, 228 New Cases In Dallas County

Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting one additional death and 228 new COVID-19 cases, bringing the total case count in the county to 10,234, including 229 deaths.

The additional death reported today is being described as a Dallas man in his 70s who was a resident of a long-term care facility. Officials said he had underlying high risk health conditions. 

Tarrant County Reports 50 New Cases

Data released by Tarrant County health officials list 50 new COVID-19 cases today, bringing the total confirmed cases countywide to 5,513 including 165 deaths.

County health data indicates that 2,292 residents have recovered from the disease.  

Denton County Reporting 16 New Cases

Denton County health officials are 16 new COVID-19 cases today. This increases the cumulative, countywide total to 1,373 confirmed cases, including 31 deaths.

Denton County Public Health is offering free drive-through COVID-19 testing Tuesday at the UNT Union Circle Parking Garage at 350 S. Welch St., in Denton from 8 a.m. to noon.

Essential employees and any community member that has COVID-19 symptoms or has been symptomatic within the past 7 days. Community members must call to pre-register for testing at 940-349-2585. 

15 New Cases In Collin County

Collin County is reporting 15 new cases of COVID-19. There have been 1,312 cases of the disease confirmed in the county, including 34 deaths.

Data released by county health officials says 922 people have successfully recovered the disease, 16 are hospitalized and 340 remain in home isolation.

Protests Unlikely To Spark Surge Of Coronavirus Cases, Experts Say

Large gatherings are known to be hotbeds for spreading viral illnesses, but experts say the protests we’re seeing in North Texas and around the country are a little different.

Outdoor protests pose less of a risk than large indoor gatherings, Dr. John Carlo, former medical director of Dallas County’s health department who now runs a local network of HIV clinics, told The Dallas Morning News.

Early outbreaks of COVID-19 were traced to multi-day professional gatherings, including a medical conference in Boston in early March that experts linked to more than 100 cases. Those meetings placed people in confined indoor spaces for long hours.

Read the full story from The Dallas Morning News.

Big Bend National Park To Begin “Phased Reopening” Tomorrow

After being closed for nearly eight weeks, Big Bend National Park will open to the public tomorrow at 9 a.m., according to the park’s superintendent.

The move comes as park officials have been drafting a document outlining when and how the public will be able to visit park facilities and trails. As it’s written, the plan calls for Big Bend National Park to open gradually and in varying stages.

While some national parks across the country have already begun reopening, Big Bend has been cautious. An important factor: the region’s limited access to healthcare. Park officials are concerned about the impact the coronavirus could have on a remote rural pocket of the state, where the nearest hospital is 3 hours away.

In an interview with Marfa Public Radio, park superintendent Bob Krumenaker says he’s taken the advice of regional, state and federal health authorities who cautioned him to “go slow, make sure it’s working.” Contributed by Houston Public Media

Texas A&M Opening 11 Campuses This Fall

The Texas A&M University System will be reopening its 11 campuses this fall.

The System’s board of regents approved plans to reopen safely during the coronavirus outbreak Friday, with a focus on limited classroom capacity. The plan calls for periodic testing, and requires students and staff to certify that they have not been infected with the virus.

Universities will be tasked with prioritizing which classes most require in person settings, and which can be offered online.

Universities also have the option to adjust their academic calendars in order to end the semester before Thanksgiving.

Saturday, May 30

Dallas County Reports 219 New Cases, 5 Deaths

Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 219 more cases of COVID-19, bringing the countywide total to 10,006. Five additional deaths are reported. They are:

  • A Dallas man in his 20s who had been critically ill in an area hospital
  • A Dallas man in his 50s who had been critically ill in an area hospital. He had underlying high risk health conditions
  • A Garland man in his 60s who had been critically ill in an area hospital. He had underlying high risk health conditions
  • A Dallas man in his 60s who had been critically ill in an area hospital. He did not have underlying high risk health conditions
  • A man in his 70s who was a resident of a Dallas long-term care facility and had been critically ill in an area hospital. He had underlying high risk health conditions.

Tarrant County Reports 84 New Cases

Tarrant County Health and Human Services is reporting 84 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the countywide total to 5,463.

Five deaths were reported Saturday. The deceased include a man in his 80s and two women in their 60s from Fort Worth, a man in his 60s from Bedford, and a man in his 40s from Arlington. All but one had underlying health conditions.

Denton County Reports Additional Death; Collin County Reports 19 New Cases

Denton County officials on Saturday announced the county's 31st death. The Carrollton resident was in his 80s. The county also reported 28 new cases for a countywide total of 1,357. Collin County Public Health reported 19 additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the countywide total to 1,297.

Read More: A Timeline Of COVID-19's Spread In North Texas 

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