Syeda Hasan | KERA News

Syeda Hasan

Reporter, Mental Health

Syeda Hasan covers mental health for KERA News. A Houston native, her journalism career has taken her to public radio newsrooms around Texas.

Before joining KERA, Syeda covered development and affordability at KUT News in Austin. She also worked as a general assignment reporter for Houston Public Media. Her work has been heard nationally on shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, PBS Newshour and Marketplace. She has won multiple Texas Associated Press Broadcasters Association awards for her coverage of the Houston Rodeo food scene and barriers to housing for people with criminal backgrounds.

Syeda got her start in public radio as an intern at KUT while earning her bachelor’s degree in journalism, with a minor in French, at the University of Texas at Austin.

Ways to Connect

From left: Robert Kaplan, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas; Terry Flowers of St. Philip's School and Community Center; and Richard Clarida of the Federal Reserve just before the listening session.
Syeda Hasan / KERA

Officials with the U.S. Federal Reserve were in Dallas Monday to launch a series of national conversations. The goal of these meetings is to understand how federal monetary policy impacts everyday people.

flag-draped coffin - veteran suicide
Shutterstock

A recent report from the Washington Post, titled "The Parking Lot Suicides," looks into the disturbing trend of veterans dying by suicide on the property of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. A North Texas nonprofit has developed a program to combat veteran suicides.

Dr. Stacia' Alexander and Lakeita Roberts are licensed professional counselors practicing in Dallas. Both are listed in the Therapy for Black Girls online directory.
Syeda Hasan / KERA News

Directories of therapists of color are becoming increasingly popular, like Therapy for Black Girls and the National Queer & Trans Therapists of Color Network. This trend seems to signal a growing openness toward mental health care among minority communities. Still, Dallas counselors say the work isn't finished.

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, left, listens as Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, right, gives his State of the State Address in the House Chamber, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, in Austin, Texas.
Associated Press

Texas Governor Greg Abbott made mental health care one of the primary themes of his State of the State address Tuesday, including more student mental health screenings.

Shutterstock

Shortly after a gunman killed 10 people at Santa Fe High School last year, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott unveiled a 40-point plan for improving school safety, which included calls for boosting mental health services for students. 

Volunteers participate in the homeless count in 2016.
Associated Press

Hundreds of volunteers will take to the streets of North Texas tomorrow to count the local homeless population. The annual count provides critical data on the state of homelessness, and this year, in Dallas and Collin counties, it’s being done under new leadership.

Shutterstock

The American Psychological Association sparked a fierce debate last week when it issued its first-ever guidelines for psychologists working with men and boys. The list of 10 guidelines suggests that men who ascribe to "traditional masculinity" may suffer negative consequences to their mental and physical health.

The Bastrop City Council voted last night to extend a moratorium on development through May 21, 2019. City leaders voted to put a 90-day pause on new development in August, with some exceptions. Last night’s vote means the development moratorium could span at least eight months in total.

If you’re a renter in Texas and you fail to pay your rent, your landlord may have the legal right to enter your home and take your belongings. The clause, called a landlord’s lien, is standard language in many residential leases, but it can also apply to stores and restaurants that fall behind on rent.

In the days after the Austin bombings, Jesus Valles couldn’t stop thoughts from buzzing around like bees in his head. He made sense of his feelings the best way he knew how: He sat down at his computer and began to write a public Facebook post about Austin.

“Austin is an exhausting place where racism smiles at you and does yoga and is a kind teacher and is such a good actor and is just trying to help you and just wants to know why you’re so upset,” Valles wrote.

If you’re a renter in Texas, there may be a clause in your lease you haven’t noticed: a landlord’s lien. The clause gives your landlord the right to come into your home and take your personal belongings if you fail to pay rent.

A development going up in East Austin could provide a more affordable option for home ownership. 

After almost a year of searching, Annette Price is settling into her new apartment in North Central Austin. She lives alone in the one-bedroom unit with her dog, Candy, but she says she doesn’t feel completely at home.

Her apartment complex is one of the few places in Austin where the 52-year-old could get approved for housing, because about 30 years ago, she was convicted of murder.

The 2020 Census will be the first time Americans can submit questionnaire responses entirely online, but while some are touting the high-tech change, the new approach concerns some advocates.

A bill that would change the way cities and counties collect property taxes is moving forward in the Texas House. On Saturday, lawmakers approved Senate Bill 1 on second reading. The measure would lower the rollback rate, or the annual percent increase in property taxes, from 8 percent to 6 percent. Any increases above that would have to go to the public for a vote.

The bill’s sponsor, Representative Dennis Bonnen, R-Angleton, repeatedly noted that SB 1 does not aim to save taxpayers any money, but it would allow them to weigh in on some increases.

Tim Mattox doesn’t want to live in Austin, but soon he might not have a choice. Mattox has lived in the River Place neighborhood for 19 years. It’s a community of about 1,100 homes just northwest of the city near Lake Austin. In December, Mattox’s neighborhood is scheduled to be annexed by the city.

This may be the most anxious time of year for affordable-housing developers in Texas. In a few weeks, they'll find out whether their applications for low-income housing tax credits have been approved, and the decision could spell life or death for their proposed projects.

Government officials and community activists from across the state gathered outside the Texas Capitol on Tuesday to voice support for taking legal action to stop the so-called “sanctuary cities" law.

A state judge has struck down a Texas law that limits the distribution rights of craft brewers.

Until a few years ago, beer distributors in Texas used to pay craft breweries for the right to sell their product, but a 2013 state law brought changes to the industry. Breweries could no longer accept payment for their “territorial rights” – in other words, the right to distribute their beer.

With the Texas open carry law in effect, visitors at this year’s South by Southwest festival could see more guns in public.

For the third year in a row, guns rights activists are planning to take to the streets at SXSW, openly displaying their firearms. Before this year, they could only legally carry long guns like rifles and shotguns. But Texas' open carry law, which went into effect in January, allows license holders to visibly wear a wide range of firearms, as long as they’re in a holster.


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