Mallory Falk / KERA | KERA News

Mallory Falk / KERA

Reporter

Mallory Falk covers El Paso and the border for KERA as part of The Texas Newsroom. That's a regional news hub linking stations across the state, the prototype for NPR's Collaborative Journalism Network. Previously she worked as a reporter at KRWG in Las Cruces, New Mexico, and WWNO, New Orleans Public Radio. Her reporting has aired nationally on programs including Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Here & Now. A winner of multiple regional Edward R. Murrow awards, Mallory is based in El Paso, and is part of the national Report for America project, which aims to support journalists in underserved areas of America.

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About a dozen members of the Hispanic Congressional Caucus toured three migrant detention facilities near El Paso on Monday as part of an investigation.

Dr. Eugene Marciniak recently examined about a dozen patients at a Catholic retreat center in Las Cruces, N.M. He set up shop at a corner table in the cafeteria and called families over one by one: a mother with belly pain, a child with a low-grade fever, a teen girl with a cracked and possibly infected tooth. They had just been released from government custody and were staying at the center for a night or two before joining relatives in other parts of the United States.

News last week that a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl died shortly after being apprehended by U.S. Customs and Border Protection has brought the nation’s focus back to the U.S.-Mexico border. That includes the tent city in Tornillo, Texas: a facility the federal government erected in June to house migrant children who recently crossed the border. The Tornillo site was supposed to be temporary, but it’s continued to expand. Over the weekend, a congressional delegation toured the site and called on the government to shut it down.

 

 


 

The U.S. says it has reunited more than 500 migrant children that the government separated from their parents. That means there are about 2,000 children to go. Officials say they have a plan, though parents and their advocates tell a different story.

On Sunday, a Department of Homeland Security bus pulled up outside Annunciation House, a shelter for migrants and refugees in El Paso, Texas. Parents filed off and walked into the shelter. Some wore their pant legs rolled up, exposing GPS ankle monitors.

It's a Saturday morning, and school marching bands are playing for a crowd. But they're not in a Mardi Gras parade. They're in the Superdome, where 120 schools are set up at long tables, putting their best faces forward and trying to recruit families.

One gives on-the-spot instrument lessons, another is showing off it's step team.

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