David Martin Davies | KERA News

David Martin Davies

David Martin Davies is  a veteran journalist with over 20 years’ experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. 

Davies is the host of "The Source," a live call-in news program that airs on KSTX at 3 pm Monday through Thursday. Since 1999 he was been the host and producer of "Texas Matters," a weekly radio news magazine that looks at the issues, events and people in the Lone Star State. 

Davies' reporting has been featured on National Public Radio, American Public Media's "Marketplace" and the BBC. He has written for "The San Antonio Light", "The San Antonio Express-News," "The Texas Observer" and others.

His reporting has been recognized with numerous awards. Davies was named the 2008 Texas Radio Journalist of the Year by the Houston Press Club. In 2015 he was recognized with two First Amendment Awards by the  Fort Worth Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The Association for Women in Communications San Antonio Professional Chapter honored Davies with the 2015 Edna McGaffey Media Excellence Headliner Award.

A San Antonio man is set to die by lethal injection on Tuesday for a murder he didn’t actually commit. As part of the notorious “Texas 7” escape, Joseph Garcia was convicted and sentenced to die under a controversial law some say is unconstitutional.

 


On the third weekend of every month is the Austin Highway Gun Show, where there are rows of tables with vendors with guns laid out for inspection and purchase. Would-be buyers slowly stroll through the venue, gazing at the pistols, rifles, semiautomatics and shotguns.


On a brisk, windy morning at the Texas-Mexico border, U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is being briefed on the deployment of about 7,000 active-duty troops on the southern border.

This week on "Texas Matters," we look at the death penalty.

Texas has executed 553 prisoners since capital punishment resumed in 1976, which is more than any other state. Over 11 years, Michelle Lyons watched 278 men and women take their last breath at the hands of the state.

Lyons joins us to discuss her experiences witnessing executions first as a newspaper reporter and then working for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in the book, “Death Row: The Final Minutes.”


Three months after the Hurricane Harvey made landfall, the Texas Coastal Bend is still far from back to normal. The Category 4 storm delivered winds of 130 miles-per-hour that battered Aransas County communities, and many residents there are still without housing.


Residents of Sutherland Springs, which is about 40 miles east of San Antonio, gathered for a prayer vigil Sunday night.

On Saturday in Denham Springs, Louisiana, about 15 miles east of Baton Rouge, the parking lot of a Sam’s Club was turned into a one-stop shop for flood victims.

Just days earlier the entire area was under water, but now this is where people can grab a shopping cart, get free cleaning supplies, cases of water, and ice.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Texas has seceded twice in its history. The attempt during the Civil War didn’t go well but one could say breaking away from Mexico did. And there are those who would like to try secession again from the United States.  The Texas Nationalist Movement says they are building momentum and voters could soon have their say about Texas independence.

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