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Monkeypox confirmed at Fort Worth ISD school

060822 Monkeypox AP
AP
/
CDC
A electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak.

The case was confirmed at Arlington Heights High School. The district did not identify the person who tested positive, and it was not clear whether the case was in a student or an adult.

Fort Worth ISD has confirmed a case of monkeypox in a person at Arlington Heights High School.

Tarrant County Public Health notified the school district of the positive test. The district did not identify the person who tested positive, and it was not clear whether the case was in a student or an adult.

Sanitizing the school began immediately, the district said.

Arlington Heights parents were told of the case by letter and advised to watch their students’ health for the next 21 days and contact a doctor if symptoms appear.

Symptoms of monkeypox can include fever, chills, head and muscle aches, and a rash or swollen lymph nodes.

The CDC lists these precautions to avoid catching monkeypox :

  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox (can initially look like pimples or blisters and may be painful or itchy).
  • Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox.
  • Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone with monkeypox.
  • Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used.
  • Do not share eating utensils or cups with a person with monkeypox.
  • Do not handle or touch the bedding, towels, or clothing of a person with monkeypox.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after you use the bathroom.

For additional information, visit the Tarrant County Public Health website.

Bill Zeeble has been a full-time reporter at KERA since 1992, covering everything from medicine to the Mavericks and education to environmental issues.