Fort Worth ISD | KERA News

Fort Worth ISD

Fort Worth voters could be looking at a bond election in November. This week, Superintendent Walter Dansby presented several possible scenarios for bond programs ranging from $585 million to $777 million. Trustees are expected to vote Aug. 23 on whether to hold a bond election in November.

Seth Sawyers / Flickr Creative Commons

Fort Worth voters could be looking at a bond election in November. This week, Superintendent Walter Dansby presented several possible scenarios for bond packages ranging from $585 million to $777 million.

According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the least costly option would include a new high school, more classrooms and security and technology improvements. A different package includes the construction costs of a performing and fine arts campus, new buses and student uniforms. Trustees are scheduled to vote on whether to hold an election on Aug. 23.

The Texas Education Agency accountability ratings out today reveal that most school districts – 92.5 percent — achieved the new “met standard” rating — the state’s temporary pass-fail system that replaced the exemplary-to-unacceptable scale. Both the Dallas and Fort Worth school systems passed.

 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

  UPDATE The Texas Education Agency accountability ratings reveal most school districts – 92.5% - achieved the new, acceptable rating “Met Standard.” Both Dallas and Fort Worth Independent School Districts “Met Standard.” there’s still a lot of work to be done.

Erik Hersman / Flickr

Fort Worth voters rejected three incumbents on the city council and school board in Saturday runoff elections

Jacinto Ramos, Jr. stomped incumbent school board member Carlos Vasquez, 86% to 14%.

School board candidate Ashley Paz narrowly unseated Juan Rangel, 51% to 49%.

Former broadcast reporter Gyna Bivens turned out sitting councilman Frank Moss, 57% to 43%.

In Dallas, Rick Callahan defeated Jesse Diaz, 60% to 40%, to represent Pleasant Grove on the Dallas City Council.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Among the challenges that many school districts face is the number of economically disadvantaged students and, in some cases, kids without a steady home.

One class in the Fort Worth Independent School District decided to tackle this problem, and they did it with style.

Fort Worth ISD Candidates Discuss Priorities, Charter Schools

May 9, 2013
Rosa Say / Flickr

Six candidates are competing for two contested seats on the Fort Worth Board of Education.  Half of the candidates responded to our questionnaire with information about:

·       Their qualifications

·       Needed changes within the district

·       Whether they support expanding charter school options

Parents, students and teachers in Fort Worth ISD can now stay digitally connected with the district and its schools. The district has launched a new free mobile app for smartphones.

61 year-old Walter Dansby officially becomes Fort Worth Independent School District’s newest Superintendent next month. He started his career with the district 38 years ago to teach and to coach basketball. KERA’s Bill Zeeble sat down with Dansby to talk about plans for the state’s 5th largest school district that comes with serious challenges.

Fort Worth’s school board has named interim superintendent Walter Dansby its lone finalist to be the district’s next superintendent. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports Dansby becomes Fort Worth’s first African American leader in the district’s 129 year history. He started working at Fort Worth ISD in 1974.

Max Klingensmith (cc) flickr

Fort Worth’s School Board “officially” names its superintendent finalist at this evening’s 5:30 board meeting. KERA’s Bill Zeeble has more.

After last Thursday’s 2nd round of candidate interviews, trustees said they found their finalist. Acting Superintendent Walter Dansby has filled the role since taking over for Melody Johnson, who resigned last year. A Long-time Fort Worth ISD employee, Dansby applied for and could be named to the job. Board Vice President Juan Rangel says the next leader takes on a large budget shortfall because of state funding cuts.

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