education | KERA News

education

Christina Ulsh

Almost 90 percent of high school students in Texas graduate from high school, although there is large variation by race, ethnicity, family income, disability, and English proficiency. At Polytechnic High School in Fort Worth, 74 percent of African-American students graduate, while 80 percent of the Latino students do.

Study Up For 'Think': Textbook Truths

Oct 6, 2014
Truthout.org / flickr

Does an education heavy on biases compromise the learning health of a classroom? The Texas State Board of Education will vote on new social studies textbooks, a first since 2002, in November. A group of professionals studied the material the proposed books will have and found numerous inaccuracies and opinions.  Professors David Brockman, religious studies scholar, and Kathleen Wellman, history intellectual,  join Krys Boyd in the textbook conversation today at 1 p.m.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera and Bob Daemmrich, Texas Tribune

The leading candidates for governor presented their visions for improving public education to one of the toughest audiences in the state -- several thousand school administrators meeting in Dallas.

scubasteveo / Flickr

We tend to associate "studying" with “hitting the books” -- lots of discipline and focus. At 1 p.m. on Think, education reporter Benedict Carey of the New York Times explains how new brain science affirms the wandering mind over a one-track approach. His new book is called How We Learn.

Courtesy of Southern Methodist University, Kim Leeson

SMU and the University of Texas at Dallas have opened new dining halls this fall. These state-of-the-art kitchens offer vegan, gluten-free, and sophisticated foods to students. 

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

School districts throughout the state are applauding a court ruling that may eventually lead to an overhaul of the way Texas pays for schools.

On Thursday State District Judge John Dietz again declared the state’s school funding system unconstitutional.

An Online and Audio Yearbook Brings Out Teenage Voices

Aug 26, 2014
RedOakVideo

Producer Dianna Douglas will help KERA bring the voices of North Texas students to the radio and to the web through our new project, the KERA Yearbook. We’re exploring the forces in teenagers’ lives that affect how they perform in high school, and whether they finish.

Fort Worth Mayor's Office

On his first day as a high school principal, Josh Delich must have covered three miles before breakfast. He ran up and down the steps of Polytechnic High in Fort Worth -- through libraries, gyms, and the cafeteria --greeting students, encouraging his teachers, and helping the parents who were registering kids at the last minute.

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What kids eat before school can greatly impact how they perform in the classroom.

In this edition of Vital Signs, Navin Hariprasad, a nutritionist and Operations Manager of Patient Food Services at Parkland Hospital, explains the difference a healthy breakfast and a balanced diet throughout the day can make.

How much are parents around the country spending on back-to-school supplies? According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Americans will drop about $8.6 billion this month on pens, notebooks, lunch boxes and more. NPR’s new education blog took a closer look at those costs by surveying nine schools around the country, including Atherton Elementary in Arlington. It checked each school’s recommended “supply list” for first, third and fifth graders.

Watch Dallas Learn At This Turn Up! Event

Aug 12, 2014
Christina Ulsh / KERA

Dallas City of Learning used the breadth of the city as a platform during its pilot season. The initiative made its last stop of the summer at Fair Oaks Park in Vickery Meadow.

The Washington Post recently published an interesting piece about the kids who can make teaching and learning nearly impossible. It’s written by a teacher, Ellie Herman, who’s been chronicling her experience on her blog Gatsby in L.A. Many teachers can probably relate. Her story is worth reading till the end. If you’re a teacher, we’d love to hear about your own experience and what you’ve learned from those difficult teaching moments.

Chime in below in the comments section.

AACP

Gaming moved from the video arcade to military bases and flight schools years ago. The next set of gamers could reshape health care.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

An annual national report on children's well-being doesn’t have a lot of good news for Texas. The Kids Count study, released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, shows that Texas still ranks in the bottom 10 states.

To be precise, Texas is No. 43.

On Friday, The Texas Tribune published a story about teacher pay and the challenges educators face in Texas. According to the piece, the average Texas teacher makes about $49,000 a year, which is about $8,000 below the national average. During the 2010-2011 school year, teacher pay in the state ranked 30th in the country, and two years later, it dropped to 35th in the nation.

Other issues, the story points out:

Bob Daemmrich/Laura Buckman / The Texas Tribune

Democrats will hit high gear at their convention Friday night with speeches by Wendy Davis, their candidate for governor, and Leticia Van de Putte, their nominee for lieutenant governor.

On Thursday, both candidates talked about their vision for education at the Texas Classroom Teachers Association conference in Fort Worth.  Davis’ Republican opponent, Greg Abbott, also spoke. 

Paul Moseley / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis talked Tuesday about building the Texas economy while her Republican opponent Greg Abbott zeroed in on Hispanic voters by releasing a Spanish language television ad.

Caydee Daniel / KERA News

These days, kids are most likely to text each other or communicate with apps like Snapchat. They post photos on Instagram and they tweet what they’re doing throughout the day. As part of KERA’s American Graduate initiative, we talk to some students about how even in this fast-paced digital world, the printed yearbook is still an end-of-the-year highlight for some students.

Study Up for 'Think': Affirmative Reaction

Jun 3, 2014
Evonne / flickr

Should colleges leave race out of the admissions equation? While support has increased for affirmative action programs in America the past several years, civil rights advocate Sheryll Cashin has another idea: schools should consider where an applicant grew up instead of the color of his or her skin. She joins Krys Boyd at 1 p.m. to discuss her new book, Place Not Race: A New Vision of Opportunity in America.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

When summer hits, many kids from low-income families miss out on activities that will keep them learning. On Wednesday, Dallas joined four other cities -- Columbus, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C. -- in a pilot program aimed at addressing the issue. They're following the lead of Chicago, which launched a similar initiative last year.

Study Up For 'Think': Why Liberal Education Matters

May 28, 2014
The LEAF Project / flickr

Which will yield the most advantageous results: higher education focused on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) or postsecondary schools based in liberal arts? At noon, Wesleyan University President Michael S. Roth will join Krys Boyd on Think to discuss his book “Beyond the University: Why Liberal Education Matters.”

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Nine out of 10 college freshmen from the top quarter of incomes graduate by age 24. But for low-income kids, it’s less than three out of 10. Writer Paul Tough spent six months at the University of Texas at Austin exploring why for his New York Times Magazine article, “The Graduation Gap.”

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The Corporation for Public Broadcasting features KERA’s Class of '17 project in this month’s Station Spotlight. Class of '17 is a five-year effort that follows North Texas students as they transition from middle school to high school and through graduation.

Western MAJ/Flickr

As part of its American Graduate initiative, KERA is looking for a North Texas high school media class to become a partner on a project called the Class of ’17 Yearbook. The idea is for the students in the class to team with teachers and KERA journalists to write posts on the KERA education blog, record and edit audio and video, and create social media streams with student-generated content.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

The second president at the University of North Texas at Dallas says his priorities include keeping tuition low and forging a relationship with employers who will help train students for high-demand jobs.  

President Ronald Brown talked with KERA's Shelley Kofler prior to giving his inaugural speech on Friday.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Dallas and Fort Worth school districts are ramping up efforts to enroll more eligible children in pre-kindergarten.  The push comes as gubernatorial candidates Greg Abbott and Wendy Davis spar over who has a better plan for early education. 

Inside the pre-kindergarten class at Dallas’ Good Street Learning Center, it might seem like the 4-year-olds keeping time with rhythm sticks are just playing a game.

The State Board of Education on Wednesday didn’t approve a statewide Mexican-American studies elective. Instead, it adopted a measure that asks publishers to submit textbooks on Mexican-American and other ethnic studies to a list of instructional materials for social studies classes by the 2016-17 school year.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

For decades, it’s been a rite of passage for American teens. Now it’s Ricky Rijos’ turn. The Flower Mound freshman is learning to drive.

Ricky is a member of KERA's Class of '17, a group of North Texas kids we’re following from eighth grade through graduation.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

State lawmakers reviewing new graduation requirements that go into effect in the fall say they’re confusing and districts may not be prepared to implement them.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Ninth-grader Joel Luera is a smart kid in a tough neighborhood. Sometimes other kids don’t get why he’s so studious. He loves to read – so much that he’s in a book club at W.W. Samuell High School in Dallas.

Joel is the latest kid to join KERA’s series Class of '17 – a five-year project following a group of North Texas students from 8th grade to graduation. It’s part of the national public media initiative American Graduate.

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