education | KERA News

education

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Schools face a constant challenge — how to get families more engaged in what’s happening in the class. In North Texas, some schools are experimenting with teachers making home visits. In Irving, one teacher’s been doing just that for years.  

Fort Worth Star-Telegram

The top local stories this morning from KERA News: Fort Worth Superintendent Kent Scribner yesterday gave an annual state of education address to the city’s Chamber of Commerce.

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Marcelo Cavazos, the man who leads Arlington’s schools system, was named Texas Superintendent of the Year this afternoon. The honor came at the annual Texas Association of School Boards conference in Houston – and it includes a $5,000 prize. The five finalists also included another North Texan, DeSoto superintendent David Harris.

This week, in an American Graduate series called “The First Week,” we’ve been listening to conversations about race after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. We’ve heard from parents, students and a teacher. Today, it's Gregg Anderson, a school resource officer who’s building relationships in the  Carrollton-Farmers Branch school district.

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

It’s the first week of school in many districts across North Texas, and students are returning to the classroom after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In this series, The First Week, KERA's reporters are listening in on the conversations about race happening in and around North Texas schools. Today, what students are saying about the violence this summer: police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a gunman's July ambush that killed five law officers in downtown Dallas.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the next five days, in a series called "The First Week," we’ll listen in on the conversations students, parents, educators and police officers are having after a summer of racial turmoil in the U.S. and police shootings in Dallas. First, we look at race through the perspective of a black family in Arlington.

For a moment, let's pretend.

That everything you know about America's public education system — the bitter politics and arcane funding policies, the rules and countless reasons our schools work (or don't) the way they do — is suddenly negotiable.

Pretend the obstacles to change have melted like butter on hot blacktop.

Now ask yourself: What could — and should — we do differently?

San Francisco Unified School District

When school starts this fall, the two biggest systems in Texas will be led by Latinos. Last year, Dallas rehired Michael Hinojosa as superintendent. Today, Houston's board of trustees unanimously chose Richard Carranza as sole finalist for its top job.

Panel Backpedals On Swapping Out STAAR Tests

Jul 27, 2016
Qiling Wang / Texas Tribune

A special panel charged with suggesting changes to the state’s testing and school accountability system will recommend that state lawmakers implement a series of individualized, computer-based exams to measure student performance and progress throughout the year.

KERA News

KERA won five awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. -- the station's best-ever performance in public radio's premiere national contest. The station also took home four Lone Star Awards from the Houston Press Club.

That brings KERA's award count for this year to 29 -- another record.

truthout.org via flickr

A race for a seat on the State Board of Education representing Northeast Texas is getting an unusual amount of attention.

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Some North Texas school districts say they’re out millions of dollars due to a software glitch, according to a Fort Worth Star-Telegram report this week. 

3 Ways To Build A Better University

Feb 17, 2016
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There are three major goals of highly selective colleges, according to Jonathan R. Cole, author of “Toward a More Perfect University.” They are to transmit knowledge, to research and discover scientific breakthroughs and to build an educated citizenry to participate in democracy.

Commentary: Dark Secrets In The Classroom

Nov 11, 2015
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His wife is a longtime teacher, but commentator Bret Wooten says it was the time he spent volunteering in her classroom that opened his eyes to her world.  

leisuretime70 / Shutterstock

The Dallas Independent School District has a high percentage of students who are economically disadvantaged and learning English. Given these challenges, district officials were pleased with how some students fared on the recent Nation’s Report Card. Here are some of the highs and lows.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Sir Ken Robinson, who boasts the most-watched TED Talk of all time, was in Dallas on Thursday for an education conference called “Changing the Odds.” Robinson argues that the current education system has some outdated assumptions about intelligence and creativity.

Commentary: Continuing Education

Aug 25, 2015
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The start of a school year for many students means new beginnings. For the family of commentator Tom Dodge, call it a case of continuing education.

Dianna Douglas

Thousands of students in North Texas are just one or two tests away from graduating high school. This year’s seniors are the first to have to pass five STAAR tests. So many haven’t passed, that Gov. Greg Abbott just signed a law giving those students a loophole.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Stuart Spitzer, a Republican from Kaufman, kicked up a controversy about sex education during a recent marathon budget debate in the Texas House. He succeeded in moving $3 million to abstinence education from programs aimed at preventing sexually transmitted diseases.

A 19-year-old woman who’s three years into motherhood explains how this plays out in real life.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Gov. Greg Abbott talks repeatedly about his commitment to pre-kindergarten education – and it was one of the key points of debate in this week’s budget marathon in the Texas House. 

Dianna Douglas

The last two decades have seen a rise in the number of police officers in middle and high schools. One unintended consequence is that many students will get criminal records long before they graduate, for offenses that aren’t necessarily criminal.

A new study is out – and it’s focused on America’s charter school petri dish, New Orleans. It shows that the charter schools there are more focused on marketing and advertising themselves, rather classroom performance. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports on what the research, from the University of Texas and Tulane, could mean for charters in North Texas.

The Country's Best Bilingual Teacher Is In Dallas ISD

Mar 9, 2015
Dianna Douglas / KERA News

The national bilingual teacher of the year is in Dallas. Irma De La Guardia is a third grade teacher at Withers Elementary in Dallas ISD, and she jetted off to Las Vegas to pick up the honor last week from the National Association for Bilingual Education. 

courtesy Commit!

The Commit partnership, an education philanthropy that works in Dallas schools, released its annual scorecard on Tuesday night, with hard numbers about how students in the region are faring. The data cover pre-kindergarten through college graduation, and show a mixed progress report.

Teens Get An Earful During Interviews With Mom And Dad

Nov 17, 2014
Christina Ulsh / KERA News

A few students at Polytechnic High School in Fort Worth and at Dubiski Career High in Grand Prairie had their own version of the StoryCorps oral history project. They were assigned to interview a family member. The students learned more than they expected when they pressed "record."

Christina Ulsh / KERA News

Texas schools are required by law to protect students from bullying, ever since the Texas Legislature passed a bullying and cyber-bullying bill in 2011. As part of the KERA Yearbook project, here are three stories about bullying from three high school students who have experienced it.

Jennifer Whitney/Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

The education issue has taken center stage in the race for lieutenant governor as the two state senators duke it out on the airwaves. 

KERA, the Dallas Morning News, NBC5 and Telemundo 39 recently asked Texans to identify the issues they're most concerned about. For five days this week we're combining forces to look at where Republican Greg Abbott and Democrat Wendy Davis stand on those issues. We began looking at the candidates' views on education, followed by the border, healthcare, the economy and infrastructure.

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Today KERA, The Dallas Morning News and KXAS-TV (NBC 5) begin a series of coordinated reports we’re calling Five Days in October. Each day we’ll look at where the leading candidates for governor stand on certain issues. We begin with education, and answers to a question about student test scores that was tweeted during KERA’s televised gubernatorial debate last week.

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