Catholic Charities Fort Worth | KERA News

Catholic Charities Fort Worth

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Catholic Charities Fort Worth says it's housing a dozen children who were separated from their families at the border after fleeing violence in Central America.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Whether it's cashing a check, wiring cash to a friend, or trying to borrow money, people living in poverty have a different experience than those on sound financial footing. One North Texas nonprofit aims to close that gap by giving those with financial means, a taste of life without.

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One nonprofit program is trying to help families think beyond a single crisis—and make real plans for the future.

Catholic Charities Fort Worth launched its Padua program just over two years ago. It’s named for Saint Anthony of Padua—who was devoted to the sick and poor. Corinne Weaver of Catholic Charities breaks down some of the early results.

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Some experts say service agencies working together-- a true holistic approach-- is the only way to get a handle on poverty.

A new Fort Worth program encourages families to think beyond that next paycheck, and make real plans for the future.

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Donating to charity is big business. Last year, $358 billion was given out and 80 percent of that came from individuals. The Philanthropy Roundtable is a national nonprofit that helps donors give wisely.

That group’s in Las Colinas for its annual meeting. And some standout North Texas groups were invited too.

www.gotcredit.com

Your credit score controls the obvious (things like mortgage eligibility) and the not so obvious (like whether you can upgrade your cable package.)

Tony Milburn is on the board for Catholic Charities Fort Worth and works in wealth management for UBS. He talks about the sometimes startling impact of poor credit.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

This summer, homeless shelters in Tarrant County are at or above capacity. And that means crowds along East Lancaster Avenue, just a 10-minute drive from downtown Fort Worth. That’s where homeless people go to find shelter, health services, and hot meals.