bike-sharing | KERA News

bike-sharing

Bike share company Ofo left an unwelcome parting gift as it exited the Dallas market: a heap of hundreds of its banana-yellow bikes. A photo of the massive pile went viral, prompting questions about who is responsible for the rental bikes — and the fate of similar bike-share ventures in other cities.

"Terrible," Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said in a tweet that featured a photo by Robert Vandling, who spotted the tangle of bikes at a collection center run by CMC Recycling American.

Andy Wong / AP

“Terrible.”

That’s all Mayor Mike Rawlings had to say on Twitter Sunday about a photo of hundreds of bright yellow bicycles piled high at a Dallas recycling plant.

Tony Gutierrez / AP

Not too long ago, you’d be hard-pressed to drive around Dallas without spotting a bright green, yellow or orange bicycle parked at an intersection, tangled in a bush or bobbing in White Rock Lake.

That’s not the case so much anymore: Three bike-sharing companies that entered the market in the past year have decided to leave town.

Molly Evans / KERA News

Dallas has let private dockless bike-share companies operate freely since they first appeared last summer. Now, city officials have drawn up some regulations.

Molly Evans / KERA News

Friday’s the deadline the city of Dallas gave bike-share companies to clean up their acts. The Denton City Council is also considering putting some regulations in place. Six months ago, tens of thousands of rental-share bikes began filling North Texas streets and sidewalks. One of the first companies was Garland-based VBikes.  

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Last month, Dallas officials gave the five bike-share companies currently operating in the city a deadline of this Friday to get their two-wheeled troops in order.  

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Dallas officials are giving the five bike-share companies that have planted small armies of brightly colored bikes across the city a deadline to get them in order.  

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Dallas City Manager T.C. Broadnax is now in his second year on the job. In his first 12 months, the city passed a billion-dollar bond package, killed the controversial Trinity Parkway project, hired a new police chief, and replaced some of the city's top brass.