abortion | KERA News

abortion

The landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade is in the spotlight again with President Trump's nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to fill the vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement. The ruling found a constitutional right to privacy extends to a woman's decision to have an abortion.

President Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy was met with swift partisan response from many in Congress, emphasizing the power of a narrow group of uncommitted senators.

A large number of Senate Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., immediately announced that they plan to vote against Kavanaugh.

From Texas Standard.

Texas is facing lawsuits over some of its abortion laws, including House Bill 2, which restricts access to abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy and requires abortion clinics to maintain the same medical facilities as hospitals. The state is also being sued over the Fetal Burial Law, which requires clinics to bury remains from abortions and miscarriages.

Texas voters are split on whether the U.S. Supreme Court should overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision creating a woman’s right to an abortion in the U.S., a new survey finds.

Public Policy Polling conducted the survey on behalf of NARAL Pro-Choice America. It found that 47 percent of Texas voters don’t want to see the landmark ruling overturned. Fifty percent of those surveyed said they would be less likely to support their senator if he voted to confirm a candidate who would overturn Roe.

President Trump has vowed not to ask prospective members of the Supreme Court about their views on Roe v. Wade, the basis for legal abortion nationwide since 1973 and the most widely discussed legal case in America in the past half-century.

President Trump also made a rather different promise to voters in 2016 in his third televised debate with Hillary Clinton. He said Roe would be overturned if he got to change the balance on the court:

Abortion rights advocates in Texas say the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy raises the stakes for laws passed by the state Legislature.

Kennedy has been the swing vote on rulings upholding access to abortions in the U.S. for decades. Most recently, he voted to strike down a Texas law known as House Bill 2, which forced the closure of multiple abortion clinics across the state.

Updated at 11:26 a.m.

The U.S. Supreme Court has reversed a lower court decision upholding a California law requiring anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to more fully disclose what they are.

Abortion providers across Texas filed a lawsuit in federal court today, challenging a slew of “burdensome” laws that have made legal abortions harder to obtain in the state.

Public opinion on abortion rights is often framed as a binary choice between two political positions, but a closer look at new polling data from Gallup reveals more nuance.

While a majority of Americans support legalized abortion in early pregnancy, most oppose it in the later stages, according to the survey.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

The Trump administration is reviving a rule that would deny federal family planning funds to organizations that provide abortions or make abortion referrals.

The rule is similar to one in place during the Reagan administration. The proposal was drafted by the Health and Human Services Department and is under review by the White House budget office.

On Friday, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., said the Trump administration cannot prevent young, undocumented women in federal custody from seeking abortions.

That includes interfering with or blocking medical appointments, abortion counseling, and abortion services.

In his State of the State Address in 2014, Gov. Phil Bryant announced a goal: "to end abortion in Mississippi."

Abortions in the United States are safe and have few complications, according to a landmark new study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The report, called "The Safety and Quality of Abortion Care in the United States," examined the four major methods used for abortions — medication, aspiration, dilation and evacuation, and induction — and examined women's care from before they had the procedure through their follow-up care.

As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump promised abortion opponents four specific actions to "advance the rights of unborn children and their mothers."

One year into his presidency, three of those items remain undone. Nevertheless, opponents of abortion have made significant progress in changing the direction of federal and state policies.

A federal judge in Texas has overturned a ban on a commonly used second-trimester abortion procedure, dealing another blow to efforts to restrict abortion in that state.

Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

More than a week after an undocumented teenager under federal custody in Texas received an abortion that became the subject of an intense court battle, the Trump administration asked the U.S. Supreme Court Friday to invalidate a lower court ruling that allowed the procedure to move forward. 

A 17-year-old girl who entered the U.S. without documentation or family told the staff at a Texas shelter in March that she wanted an abortion.

Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled Tuesday that an undocumented teenager under federal custody in Texas can have the abortion she requested immediately, reversing a ruling issued Friday by a three-judge panel that blocked her from getting the procedure right away.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., has ruled that a detained teenage immigrant may not obtain an abortion until a government-approved sponsor can be secured by the end of the month.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit split 2-1 on the ruling.

This post has been updated.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit is giving the Trump administration until Oct. 31 to find and approve a sponsor for a pregnant unaccompanied minor in federal custody in Brownsville, Texas.  

A federal appeals court has temporarily blocked a judge's ruling that would have allowed a detained teenager who is in the U.S. illegally to have an abortion, in the latest twist in a legal battle between the ACLU and the Trump administration.

Callie Richmond / The Texas Tribune

A federal judge ruled Wednesday that a pregnant, undocumented teenager under federal custody has the right to access abortion services in Texas. Jane Doe, as she's referred to in court filings, is expected to attend a mandatory abortion counseling appointment tomorrow and have the abortion procedure on Friday or Saturday.

A federal court denied a request Wednesday from attorneys advocating on behalf of a pregnant minor in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement in Brownsville. The teenager is being prevented from getting an abortion because of a Trump administration policy that bars unaccompanied immigrant minors from accessing them.

Updated 4:52 pm

The Trump administration is rolling back the Obama-era requirement that employer-provided health insurance policies cover birth control methods at no cost to women.

According to senior officials with the Department of Health and Human Services, the goal of the new rule is to allow any company or nonprofit group to exclude the coverage for contraception if it has a religious or moral objection.

A federal court in Austin has blocked a Texas law scheduled to take effect tomorrow that outlaws one of the most common types of second-trimester abortions.

Oregon, Texas Lay Down Markers On Abortion Coverage

Aug 23, 2017

Federal health insurance rules are a moving target, and it's unclear whether Republicans will take another run at replacing the Affordable Care Act. In the meantime, some states are staking out strong positions on coverage of abortion, regardless of how the federal landscape changes.

Abbott Signs Bill Restricting Insurance Coverage Of Abortion

Aug 15, 2017
Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott on Tuesday signed a bill that will require Texas women to pay an extra health insurance premium for non-emergency abortions, one of three abortion-related items the governor placed on lawmakers' agendas for the special session. 

Bob Daemmrich for the Texas Tribune

A bill that would require physicians and health care facilities to report more details on abortion complications to the state — and would fine those that do not comply — has now passed both chambers of the Texas Legislature.

From Texas Standard:

Rhetoric from lawmakers on both sides of the abortion debate raged on at the state Capitol on Tuesday over a Republican bill that would require women to pay a separate health insurance premium to get coverage for abortions that are not deemed medical emergencies. The bill is one of several abortion-related measures making headway during this legislative special session.

State Reps. Donna Howard (D-Austin) and John Smithee (R-Amarillo), the bill's author, hold opposing viewpoints on the proposed legislation, and each provide a sample of their parties' position on the bill.

Bob Daemmrich for the Texas Tribune

Texas women would have to pay a separate health insurance premium to get coverage for non-emergency abortions — what an opponent dubbed "rape insurance" — under a bill given early approval by the Texas House on Tuesday.

Pages