Marissa Evans, Texas Tribune | KERA News

Marissa Evans, Texas Tribune

Marissa Evans reports on health and human service policy issues for the Tribune and has been in Austin since October 2016. Before the Tribune she reported for CQ Roll Call in D.C. where she covered state legislatures and health care issues. Her reporting has appeared in Civil Eats, NBC BLK, Cosmo for Latinas, Kaiser Health News, The Seattle Times, The Washington Post, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, The Star Tribune and Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service. She is a 2013 alumna of Marquette University in Milwaukee. When not reporting, she is teaching herself how to code, re-perfecting her chocolate chip cookie recipe, searching for food spots that rival her mother’s cooking, exploring museums, catching up on books and watching documentaries. 

Photo by Spencer Selvidge

Editor's note: this story has been updated throughout

A U.S. Border Patrol agent has been accused of going on a nearly two-week-long “serial killing spree” that came to an end on Saturday after he was arrested him in connection with the deaths of four women and the kidnapping of a fifth woman.

Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

U.S. District Judge David Alan Ezra struck down a Texas law on Wednesday that would have required hospitals and clinics to bury or cremate fetal remains, causing another courtroom setback for state leaders and anti-abortion groups.

Obtained by The Texas Tribune

Only one word comes to mind looking at photos that employees at the Texas Department of State Health Services in Austin took of gray, green and brown-hued mold dotting their office furniture: Ew.

Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

State and reproductive rights attorneys are going head to head again in federal court on Monday to argue whether Texas should require health providers to cremate or bury fetal remains.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT News

Attorney General Ken Paxton is leading Texas into a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma for exacerbating the opioid crisis among Texans.

Tracy Ryans pulls out client applications containing private information that was mistakenly sent to her from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, on April 24, 2018.
Pu Ying Huang for The Texas Tribune

Tracy Ryans got mail — straight from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, including a box full of state assistance application forms with hundreds of people’s social security card numbers, green card certificates, billing statements, check stubs and photocopies of driver’s licenses.

 

Tim Park for The Texas Tribune

Texas served thousands more people in its women’s health and family planning programs last year compared to the year before. But it’s impossible to say if the number of women accessing such services has returned to the levels they were at before massive budget cuts during the 2011 legislative session.

Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

Texas’ second attempt to require health providers to bury or cremate fetal remains has been temporarily thwarted by a federal judge and another court battle is imminent.

A federal judge has ruled Texas will continue to need oversight of how it cares for vulnerable children, even after sweeping legislative changes last year.

Reynaldo Leal

Texas now has enough federal money to keep alive its health insurance program for more than 450,000 uninsured kids and pregnant women through the end of March, a state official said on Friday. 

Elizabeth Ann Colette/Wikimedia Commons

The Trump administration is guaranteeing Texas $135 million to continue helping more than 450,000 uninsured children and pregnant women if Congress doesn’t renew authorization the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

House lawmakers tentatively approved a series of bills Monday aimed at helping Texas curb its unusually high rate of women dying less than a year after childbirth.

Bob Daemmrich/The Texas Tribune

The Center for Reproductive Rights and Planned Parenthood announced on Thursday they're suing over a provision in Texas' Senate Bill 8, which outlaws dilation and evacuation abortions.

Ayan Mittra / The Texas Tribune

WASHINGTON – At first blush on Thursday, Senate Republicans were no closer to passing a new health care bill than they were two weeks ago when their first bill collapsed. 

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott signed four child welfare bills into law on Wednesday, measures that aim to recalibrate how the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services works with endangered children across the state.