Camille Phillips | KERA News

Camille Phillips

Camille Phillips covers education for Texas Public Radio.

She previously worked at St. Louis Public Radio, where she reported on the racial unrest in Ferguson, the impact of the opioid crisis and, most recently, education.

Camille was part of the news team that won a national Edward R. Murrow and a Peabody Award for One Year in Ferguson, a multi-media reporting project. She also won a regional Murrow for contributing to St. Louis Public Radio’s continuing coverage on the winter floods of 2016.

Her work has aired on NPR’s "Morning Edition" and national newscasts, as well as public radio stations in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Camille grew up in southwest Missouri and moved to New York City after college. She taught middle school Spanish in the Bronx before beginning her journalism career.

She has an undergraduate degree from Truman State University and a master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

A feel-good recognition during a state board meeting Thursday turned into a surprise for Texas Higher Education Commissioner Raymund Paredes when a college administrator told the board course transfer issues are common place, even when students follow state transfer plans called fields of study.

Four months after the U.S. Department of Education found that the Texas Education Agency had broken federal law by effectively setting a cap on the number of children who could receive special education services, TEA has released the final draft of its plan to comply with federal monitoring requirements.

For the second month in a row, the Texas unemployment rate reached a new low since 1976, the earliest year data is available online from the Bureau for Labor Statistics.

Updated 12/19 11:15 a.m.

When the exclusions and exceptions the state grants charter schools are stripped away, Texas charter schools have an average graduation rate almost 30 percentage points lower than the state’s traditional school districts.