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Poll: Rural Texans Wish There Were More Jobs, But They Are Happy Where They Are

Texans in the rural counties that make up the vast majority of the state’s geography are overwhelmingly happy with their quality of life, about their public schools and the quality of the natural environment around them, according to the 2018 Future of Rural Texas Poll released this week in connection with The Future of Rural Texas: A Texas Tribune Symposium held in College Station.

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Think

History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd. Monday-Thursday, noon-2 pm; Friday, 1-2 pm on KERA 90.1.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: In the dry, hot heart of Arizona lies the 372,000 acre Gila River reservation, home to the Native American Pima tribe. The local hospital, some telephone polls, and the occasional low-rise building interrupt the pale, flat desert vista of green, single story-tall cactus. Conditions appear so barren and harsh, one might conclude things haven't changed here for thousands of years, which is about as long as Native Americans have lived here.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: In the dry, hot heart of Arizona lies the 372,000 acre Gila River reservation, home to the Native American Pima tribe. The local hospital, some telephone polls, and the occasional low-rise building interrupt the pale, flat desert vista of green, single story-tall cactus. Conditions appear so barren and harsh, one might conclude things haven't changed here for thousands of years, which is about as long as Native Americans have lived here.

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble , KERA 90.1 Reporter: 17 year-old Andrew Martinez lives in the heart of San Antonio's Hispanic barrio with his mom, an aunt, and diabetes.

Andrew Martinez: The whole family's diabetic in this household.

Dallas, TX – Kurt Hubler, KERA 90.1 Reporter: When the R-S-R smelter first opened at Singleton and Westmoreland in the late 1930?s, it provided material used in ammunition for World War Two, by removing lead from automotive batteries. But residents like Patricia Stevens, now the President of the Westmoreland Heights Neighborhood Association, say growing up next to the facility was a battle in itself.

Dallas, TX – [Ambient sound of hyperbaric chamber]

Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: 16 million people in this country have diabetes. While two-thirds know it, the rest - five and a half million - don't. It's called "the silent killer."

Margaret Eckerd, insurance employee and diabetic: I was just discovered to have the diabetes.

FORT WORTH – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: When you walk into the Wayne Thiebaud exhibit, the first painting you'll see is a still life of cakes. They're 17 of them. All on simple cake stands. Exhibition organizer Stephen Nash of San Francisco describes Thiebaud's technique as "gooey," with paint almost dripping off the canvas.

Stephen Nash, Chief Curator of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco: Well, he is like a pastry chef in a way where he's actually decorating the cakes and pies with frosting, so to speak.

DALLAS – Virginia Whitehill, Activist and Grandmother: Jill, look at this. This is the woman who made - Grace Murray Hopper - made the modern computer possible.

FORT WORTH – Kenneth Barr, Mayor, City of Fort Worth: Motion by a vote of six to one. [Clapping]

DALLAS – [Ambient sound of Buddhists chanting]

Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Devout Buddhists in Dallas begin each morning with 90 minutes of devotional meditation. They dress in black robes and sit on tiny platforms while incense and the steady beat of a spiritual chant fill the air.

[More chanting]

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Latest from NPR

Officials are still tallying losses and combating both growing and receding fires as several large blazes rage across California. Meanwhile, a list of missing persons in Butte County is now seven pages long, totaling some 300 names.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Newly elected Democratic mayor Arturo Garino was busy with Election Day when the Army arrived in Nogales and started erecting coils of glistening razor wire along the tops of the border wall that separates his small U.S. town from its sister in Mexico.

"Razor wire, concertina wire is not what you want to see on a fence with two countries that have been friends and traded forever," he said.

Operation Secure Line

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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JFK In Dallas

KERA stories from that fateful day in November 1963.

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