KERA News | News for North Texas

Top Stories

Ron Jenkins / AP

Investigation Into Dallas Mavericks Workplace Reveals Sexual Misconduct Over 20 Years

Owner Mark Cuban has agreed to contribute $10 million to to help further the cause of women in sports and raise awareness about domestic violence following a workplace investigation of the Dallas Mavericks. The results of a seven-month-long investigation into sexual harassment and workplace misconduct within the Mavericks organization were released Wednesday. The investigation reviewed a period spanning more than 20 years.

Read More

Think

History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd. Monday-Thursday, noon-2 pm; Friday, 1-2 pm on KERA 90.1.

KHVN 970 AM announcer (on tape): Heaven 97. It is now time for a special edition, a special program, a 15-minute program on the Lee Alcorn controversy.

Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: The controversy that rocked Dallas's African-American and Jewish communities began Monday. Local NAACP President Lee Alcorn was appearing on KHVN, a black gospel radio station, when he criticized Al Gore for picking Senator Joseph Lieberman, who is Jewish, over an African-American as his running mate.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: DART's current plans for light rail in North Texas do not hinge on the results of Saturday's election. The same cities will get light rail service no matter how the vote turns out. The big question is when.

Jesse Oliver, Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) Board Chair: It moves up on an average of five years.

Sprague: Jesse Oliver is chair of the DART Board.

Oliver: So rather than waiting until 2010, 2008 for that service, we're talking about 2004, 2006.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: As soon as former Superintendent Bill Rojas announced he wanted to leave the Dallas public schools, local business leaders began calling for trustees to consider hiring a non-traditional candidate: someone with management and leadership skills, but not necessarily a background in education. Dozens of community leaders turned out last night to voice their opposition to this proposal. Adelfa Callejo is a long-time Hispanic activist.

Dallas, TX – This year's U.S. Presidential candidates have been putting more effort into reaching the nation's estimated 31.3 million Latinos, and a new survey indicates their attention is well warranted. A June-July poll conducted by a group of public broadcasters indicates that U.S. Hispanics believe strongly that they have a stake in this year's presidential election -- and that more than 5.8 million Latinos are preparing to vote.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Nearly one million people come to the United States to live each year. The majority of those immigrants are Latino, like Cuca Gonzalez and her family, who live on Fort Worth's north side.

[A woman pours a glass a juice and asks, in Spanish, "Do you want some?"]

Dallas, TX – Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Education was the number two issue among Latinos, after racism and discrimination, in the Public Broadcasting Latino Poll 2000. That comes as no surprise to Dallas attorney Marcos Ronquillo. He recently served on the national board of MALDEF (the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund).

Marcos Ronquillo, Dallas attorney and MALDEF board member: I think everyone considers education a key to the American dream.

Plano, TX – [BAM!] Agghh; not bad.

Bill Zeeble, KERA 90.1 reporter: Chris Nash, A/K/A Chris Chronic, is teaching 19 year-old Justin Williams some professional wrestling basics in the Slam Shack ring at the back of a recreation center in Plano.

Chris Nash, professional wrestler and teacher: You going to hit? You're going to have your arms out. [Slap!] Make it pop. Make it hurt. [BAM!] Give it a reason. Don't have your arms out there for nothing. Or they'll get hurt. Awright?

Pages

Latest from NPR

Conservationists have developed a new high-tech strategy to trace the cartels that smuggle much of the illegal ivory around the world — by using DNA to track ivory back to specific ports.

Biologist Samuel Wasser from the University of Washington is behind the effort. He notes that while poaching in Africa has dipped recently, too many elephants are still dying.

"Right now we're estimating that there are about 40,000 elephants being killed every year," he says, "and there are only 400,000 left in Africa. So that's a tenth of the population a year."

The uproar over clergy sex abuse in the Catholic church is no longer just about sex abuse. It now touches on Catholic teaching about sexuality in general and even on Pope Francis himself, his agenda, and the future of his papacy.

When a Pennsylvania grand jury last month reported that more than 300 priests had molested more than a thousand children across six dioceses under investigation, it became clear that the cases were not isolated incidents. The problem of abusive priests and the bishops who cover up for them is systemic across the whole church.

Copyright 2018 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit WNYC Radio.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

North Korea announced today that it will permanently close a major missile test site. Kim Jong Un, the North's leader, said the site would be dismantled in the presence of international inspectors.

Our Most Popular Stories

flickr.com/davehensley

Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

Read More

The best stories from KERA sent to your inbox.

Still On The Edge

The North Texas economy has seen tremendous gains. Many, though, have not shared in that success.